OECD Economic Surveys: United States

Frequency :
Every 18 months
ISSN :
1999-0103 (online)
ISSN :
1995-3046 (print)
DOI :
10.1787/19990103
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OECD’s periodic surveys of the United States economy. Each edition surveys the major challenges faced by the country, evaluates the short-term outlook, and makes specific policy recommendations. Special chapters take a more detailed look at specific challenges. Extensive statistical information is included in charts and graphs.

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OECD Economic Surveys: United States 2014

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Author(s):
OECD
Publication Date :
13 June 2014
Pages :
112
ISBN :
9789264206991 (PDF) ; 9789264219656 (EPUB) ; 9789264206984 (print)
DOI :
10.1787/eco_surveys-usa-2014-en

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OECD's 2014 Economic Survey of the United States examines recent economic developments, policies and prospects. Special chapters cover improving well-being and making the best of new energy resources.

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    • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economics/oecd-economic-surveys-united-states-2014/basic-statistics-of-the-united-states-2012_eco_surveys-usa-2014-1-en
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    Basic statistics of the United States, 2012

    This Survey is published on the responsibility of the Economic and Development Review Committee (EDRC) of the OECD, which is charged with the examination of the economic situation of member countries.The economic situation and policies of the United States were reviewed by the Committee on 21 May 2014. The draft report was then revised in the light of the discussions and given final approval as the agreed report of the whole Committee on 2 June 2014.The Secretariat’s draft report was prepared for the Committee by Douglas Sutherland and Aida Caldera Sánchez, with statistical research from Valery Dugain, under the supervision of Patrick Lenain.The previous Survey of the United States was issued in June 2012.Information about the latest as well as previous Surveys and more information about how Surveys are prepared is available at www.oecd.org/eco/surveys.

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    Executive summary
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    • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economics/oecd-economic-surveys-united-states-2014/assessment-and-recommendations_eco_surveys-usa-2014-3-en
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    Assessment and recommendations
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    • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economics/oecd-economic-surveys-united-states-2014/follow-up-to-previous-oecd-policy-recommendations_eco_surveys-usa-2014-4-en
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    Follow-up to previous OECD policy recommendations

    This annex reviews action taken on recommendations from previous Surveys. They cover the following areas: macroeconomic policy priorities, structural policy priorities and health policy priorities. Each recommendation is followed by a note of actions taken since the June 2012 Survey. Recommendations that are new in this Survey are listed in the relevant chapter.

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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Thematic chapters

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      • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economics/oecd-economic-surveys-united-states-2014/improving-well-being_eco_surveys-usa-2014-5-en
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      Improving well-being

      Life is quite good in the United States compared to other OECD countries, thanks to strong economic growth and technological progress having lifted average income to high levels. Nonetheless, there is evidence to suggest that the benefits from these gains have not been sufficiently broad based. Self-reported happiness increases with income, an issue particularly resonant in a country with among the highest levels of income inequality in the OECD and a pattern of inequality that appears to be moving toward even more concentration at the very top at the expense of the middle class and the poor. Working hours that remain among the longest in the OECD are also creating challenges for work-life balances, child education, personal care and leisure. These pressures are contributing to higher job strain and work-related stress with unhealthy consequences, including for mental health, and a detrimental impact on employability and medical costs. While these trends cannot be easily reversed, a number of policy options are being usefully rolled out and other initiatives are being considered: federal-level policies improving access to health care and early-childhood education, state-level initiatives favouring workplace flexibility, firm-level investments in job quality and greater attention to the health consequences of job-stress. If successfully adopted, they would go a long way toward improving the well-being of American working families.

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      • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economics/oecd-economic-surveys-united-states-2014/making-the-best-of-new-energy-resources_eco_surveys-usa-2014-6-en
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      Making the best of new energy resources

      Since around 2007, the country has been enjoying an energy renaissance thanks to its abundant stocks of shale oil and gas. The resurgence in oil and gas production is beginning to create discernible economic impacts and has changed the landscape for natural gas prices in the United States, boosting competitiveness. In order to reap the benefits fully, significant investment is needed. Federal and state governments capture some of the resource rents, but there are potential opportunities to increase taxation and use the revenues to support future well‑being. Taxing natural resource rents with profit taxes can be less distortionary than other forms of taxation, though only one state uses this form of tax. Production of shale resources, like other forms of resource extraction, poses a number of challenges for the environment. Respecting demands on water resources requires adequate water rights are in place while state and federal regulators need to monitor the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing closely and strengthen regulations as needed. Natural gas is a potential bridge fuel towards a lower carbon economy, helping to reduce emissions by leading to a substitution away from coal. Flanking measures are desirable to counter natural gas hindering renewables and low prices stymieing innovation.

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      Glossary
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