OECD Economic Surveys: Japan 2008
Hide / Show Abstract

OECD Economic Surveys: Japan 2008

This 2008 edition of OECD's periodic survey of the Japanese economy finds Japan experiencing the longest expansion in its post-war history.  Moving forward, this survey examines some of Japan's key challenges including bringing an end to deflation, achieving progress on fiscal consolidation, reforming the tax system, enhancing the productivity of the services sector, and coping with population ageing dualism.
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/1008041e.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economics/oecd-economic-surveys-japan-2008_eco_surveys-jpn-2008-en
  • READ
 
Chapter
 

Enhancing the productivity of the service sector in Japan You do not have access to this content

English
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/1008041ec007.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economics/oecd-economic-surveys-japan-2008/enhancing-the-productivity-of-the-service-sector-in-japan_eco_surveys-jpn-2008-7-en
  • READ
Author(s):
OECD

Hide / Show Abstract

Labour productivity growth in the service sector, which accounts for 70% of Japan’s economic output and employment, has slowed markedly in recent years in contrast to manufacturing. The disappointing performance is associated with weak competition in the service sector resulting from strict product market regulation and the low level of import penetration and inflows of foreign direct investment (FDI). Reversing the deceleration in productivity growth in the service sector is essential to raise Japan’s growth potential. The key is to eliminate entry barriers, accelerate regulatory reform, upgrade competition policy and reduce barriers to trade and inflows of FDI. Special attention should be given to factors limiting productivity growth in services characterised by either low productivity or high growth potential, such as retail, transport, energy and business services. Finally, it is essential to increase competition in public services, such as health and education, where market forces have been weak
Also available in French
 
Visit the OECD web site