OECD Economic Surveys: Iceland 2011
Hide / Show Abstract

OECD Economic Surveys: Iceland 2011

The 2011 edition of OECD's periodic economic review of Iceland's economy.  This edition includes chapters covering restoring the financial sector, securing sustainable public finances, returning to work in Iceland, and ensuring a sustainable and efficient fishery.

Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/1011101e.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economics/oecd-economic-surveys-iceland-2011_eco_surveys-isl-2011-en
  • READ
Publication Date :
21 June 2011
DOI :
10.1787/eco_surveys-isl-2011-en
 
Chapter
 

Ensuring a sustainable and efficient fishery You do not have access to this content

Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/1011101ec007.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economics/oecd-economic-surveys-iceland-2011/ensuring-a-sustainable-and-efficient-fishery_eco_surveys-isl-2011-7-en
  • READ
Author(s):
OECD
Pages :
99–115
DOI :
10.1787/eco_surveys-isl-2011-7-en

Hide / Show Abstract

Iceland has managed its large fishing industry in a sustainable and profitable way. The foundations of this success are setting Total Allowable Catches (TACs) based on scientific recommendations of what is biologically sustainable and the Individual Transferable Quota (ITQ) system, which gives each holder the right to catch a certain of the TAC in various species. The efficiency of this system could be under threat from potential policy responses to the perceived unfairness of quotas having initially been given away and by Iceland’s possible accession to the EU. However, there is nothing the government can do now to undo the unfairness of the initial allocation. Nevertheless, it could be attractive to increase the special fisheries resource rent tax as it is likely to be a more efficient tax than most others, although the increase should not be so great as to damage the fisheries management system. The resource rent could also be increased by reducing TACs from the current, biologically sustainable level to the level that maximizes rent. Provided that Iceland is able to negotiate to maintain the authority to set TACs and to keep the ITQ system, joining the EU, and hence the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), should not reduce the efficiency of the Icelandic fisheries management system.
Also available in: French