National Accounts at a Glance 2009
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National Accounts at a Glance 2009

National Accounts data is more than just GDP.  This book, to be published annually, and its related database present national accounts in a way that reflects the richness inherent in the data and the value that represents for analysts and policymakers.  It responds to the Stiglitz Commission’s recommendation that policymakers look beyond GDP to get a fuller picture of the entire economy.

In particular it uses national accounts data to show important findings about households and governments, including important new series on gross adjusted household income and non-financial fixed assets of households. It presents each of the series on a two-page spread, with the page on the left providing information on the meaning, usage, and comparability of the data and the page on the right presenting data from 1995 onwards for the OECD countries as well as graphics highlighting differences among countries.

This book includes OECD’s unique StatLink service, which enables readers to download Excel®  versions of tables and graphs. Look for the StatLink at the foot of each table and graph.

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Publication Date :
15 Feb 2010
DOI :
10.1787/9789264067981-en
 
Chapter
 

Net Lending/Net Borrowing You or your institution have access to this content

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Author(s):
OECD
DOI :
10.1787/9789264075108-11-en

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Net lending/borrowing is one of only two balancing items in the SNA where the reference to "net" is not in juxtaposition to "gross": in other words it is not in reference to lending net of depreciation. If it is positive it is described as net lending and if negative, as net borrowing. It reflects the amount of financial assets that are available for lending or needed for borrowing to finance all expenditures – current, gross capital formation, non-produced non-financial assets, and capital transfers – in excess of disposable income. Its importance as an economic concept is best illustrated by the fact that it forms one of the two Maastricht excessive deficit criteria used by the European Commission to assess the soundness and sustainability of public finances.