OECD Economics Department Working Papers

ISSN: 
1815-1973 (online)
DOI: 
10.1787/18151973
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Working papers from the Economics Department of the OECD that cover the full range of the Department’s work including the economic situation, policy analysis and projections; fiscal policy, public expenditure and taxation; and structural issues including ageing, growth and productivity, migration, environment, human capital, housing, trade and investment, labour markets, regulatory reform, competition, health, and other issues.

The views expressed in these papers are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the OECD or of the governments of its member countries.

 

Improving infrastructure in the United Kingdom You or your institution have access to this content

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Author(s):
Mauro Pisu1, Barbara Pels2, Novella Bottini
Author Affiliations
  • 1: OECD, France

  • 2: Organization of American States, United States

09 July 2015
Bibliographic information
No.:
1244
Pages:
48
DOI: 
10.1787/5jrxqbqc7m0p-en

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The United Kingdom (UK) has spent less on infrastructure compared to other OECD countries over the past three decades. The perceived quality of UK infrastructure assets is close to the OECD average but lower than in other G7 countries. Capacity constraints have emerged in some sectors, such as electricity generation, air transport and roads. Developing and regularly updating a national infrastructure strategy, with the National Infrastructure Plan being a welcome first step in this direction, would contribute to reduce policy uncertainty and tackle capacity constraints in a durable way. The design of coherent development plans by local authorities congruent with the national and local planning systems should continue to improve project delivery. The government intends to finance a large share of infrastructure spending to 2020 and beyond through private capital. Unlocking private investment in a cost effective and transparent way could be supported by further improving incentives for greenfield investment, continuing to carefully assess and record public-private partnerships, and promoting more long-term financing instruments. This Working Paper relates to the 2015 OECD Economic Survey of the United Kingdom (www.oecd.org/eco/surveys/economic-survey-united-kingdom.htm).
Keywords:
public-private partnerships, energy, private investment, infrastructure, transport, railways, road transport
JEL Classification:
  • H54: Public Economics / National Government Expenditures and Related Policies / Infrastructures ; Other Public Investment and Capital Stock
  • L91: Industrial Organization / Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities / Transportation: General
  • L92: Industrial Organization / Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities / Railroads and Other Surface Transportation
  • L93: Industrial Organization / Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities / Air Transportation
  • L94: Industrial Organization / Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities / Electric Utilities
  • L95: Industrial Organization / Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities / Gas Utilities ; Pipelines ; Water Utilities
  • L96: Industrial Organization / Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities / Telecommunications
  • L98: Industrial Organization / Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities / Government Policy
 
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