OECD Economics Department Working Papers

ISSN: 
1815-1973 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/18151973
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Working papers from the Economics Department of the OECD that cover the full range of the Department’s work including the economic situation, policy analysis and projections; fiscal policy, public expenditure and taxation; and structural issues including ageing, growth and productivity, migration, environment, human capital, housing, trade and investment, labour markets, regulatory reform, competition, health, and other issues.

The views expressed in these papers are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the OECD or of the governments of its member countries.

 

Health Status Determinants

Lifestyle, Environment, Health Care Resources and Efficiency You or your institution have access to this content

English
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Author(s):
Isabelle Joumard, Christophe André1, Chantal Nicq1, Olivier Chatal1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: OECD, France

04 Aug 2008
Bibliographic information
No.:
627
Pages:
74
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/240858500130

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This paper aims to shed light on the contribution of health care and other determinants to the health status of the population and to provide evidence on whether or not health care resources are producing similar value for money across OECD countries. First, it discusses the pros and cons of various indicators of the health status, concluding that mortality and longevity indicators have some drawbacks but remain the best available proxies. Second, it suggests that changes in health care spending, lifestyle factors (smoking and alcohol consumption as well as diet), education, pollution and income have been important factors behind improvements in health status. Third, it derives estimates of countries’ relative performance in transforming health care resources into longevity from two different methods – panel data regressions and data envelopment analysis – which give remarkably consistent results. The empirical estimates suggest that potential efficiency gains might be large enough to raise life expectancy at birth by almost three years on average for OECD countries, while a 10% increase in total health spending would increase life expectancy by three to four months.
Keywords:
health status, spending efficiency, public expenditure, data envelopment analysis, panel data regressions, healthcare
JEL Classification:
  • C23: Mathematical and Quantitative Methods / Single Equation Models ; Single Variables / Panel Data Models ; Spatio-temporal Models
  • H51: Public Economics / National Government Expenditures and Related Policies / Government Expenditures and Health
  • I12: Health, Education, and Welfare / Health / Health Behavior
  • O57: Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth / Economywide Country Studies / Comparative Studies of Countries
 
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