OECD Economics Department Working Papers

ISSN: 
1815-1973 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/18151973
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Working papers from the Economics Department of the OECD that cover the full range of the Department’s work including the economic situation, policy analysis and projections; fiscal policy, public expenditure and taxation; and structural issues including ageing, growth and productivity, migration, environment, human capital, housing, trade and investment, labour markets, regulatory reform, competition, health, and other issues.

The views expressed in these papers are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the OECD or of the governments of its member countries.

 

Education Reform in Japan You or your institution have access to this content

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Author(s):
Randall S. Jones1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: OECD, France

06 Sep 2011
Bibliographic information
No.:
888
Pages:
45
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5kg58z7g95np-en

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While Japan has achieved outstanding scores on the PISA exams, further improving educational outcomes is important to sustain growth in the face of rapid population ageing. The government should step up investment in early childhood education and care and integrate childcare and kindergarten to improve its quality, while allowing some diversity in the type of institutions. Upgrading tertiary education, in part through stronger competition and internationalisation, is also important to increase human capital and boost the role of universities in innovation. Given the serious fiscal situation, reforms to further raise the efficiency of educational spending per student, which is above the OECD average for public and private outlays combined, are needed. The large share of private education spending, which accounts for one-third of the total, places heavy burdens on families, thereby discouraging fertility, and creates inequality in educational opportunities and outcomes. Reducing dependence on private after-school educational institutions known as juku would help reduce the burden and enhance fairness. This Working Paper relates to the 2011 OECD Economic Survey of Japan (www.oecd.org/eco/surveys/Japan).
Keywords:
older workers, work-life balance, employment protection, fertility rate, dispatched workers, non-regular workers, Japan, fixed-term contracts, vocational training, dualism, part-time workers, labour force participation rates, female employment, labour market, Japanese economy
JEL Classification:
  • I21: Health, Education, and Welfare / Education and Research Institutions / Analysis of Education
  • I23: Health, Education, and Welfare / Education and Research Institutions / Higher Education ; Research Institutions
  • I24: Health, Education, and Welfare / Education and Research Institutions / Education and Inequality
  • I28: Health, Education, and Welfare / Education and Research Institutions / Government Policy
 
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