OECD Economics Department Working Papers

ISSN: 
1815-1973 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/18151973
Hide / Show Abstract
Working papers from the Economics Department of the OECD that cover the full range of the Department’s work including the economic situation, policy analysis and projections; fiscal policy, public expenditure and taxation; and structural issues including ageing, growth and productivity, migration, environment, human capital, housing, trade and investment, labour markets, regulatory reform, competition, health, and other issues.

The views expressed in these papers are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the OECD or of the governments of its member countries.

 

Boosting R&D outcomes in Australia You or your institution have access to this content

English
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/93d19106-en.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economics/boosting-r-d-outcomes-in-australia_93d19106-en
  • READ
Author(s):
Vassiliki Koutsogeorgopoulou1, Taejin Park2
Author Affiliations
  • 1: OECD, France

  • 2: Bank for International Settlements, Switzerland

08 June 2017
Bibliographic information
No.:
1391
Pages:
40
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/93d19106-en

Hide / Show Abstract

R&D activity can play a central role in raising productivity. Australia compares well in terms of research excellence. However, there is scope for better translation of publicly funded research into commercial outcomes. Strengthening incentives for collaborative research is essential. A simpler funding system for university research that provides sharper and more transparent incentives for research partnerships is important in this regard. Research-business linkages would also be boosted by more effective programmes encouraging business to collaborate, measures promoting greater mobility of researchers between the two sectors, and steps to ensure that intellectual property arrangements are not a barrier to knowledge. In Australia financial support for encouraging business innovation relies mostly on an R&D tax incentive; raising additionality and reducing compliance costs would enhance the effectiveness of the scheme. Maximising the benefits from public investment in research further hinges upon a well-coordinated science, research and innovation system through a “whole-of-government” approach and consolidating certain programmes. Reform initiatives underway, notably those in the National Innovation and Science Agenda, are welcome.

 
Keywords:
co-ordination, commercialisation, collaboration, evaluation, funding
JEL Classification:
  • I23: Health, Education, and Welfare / Education and Research Institutions / Higher Education ; Research Institutions
  • O30: Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth / Innovation ; Research and Development ; Technological Change ; Intellectual Property Rights / General
  • O38: Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth / Innovation ; Research and Development ; Technological Change ; Intellectual Property Rights / Government Policy
 
Visit the OECD web site