OECD Statistics Working Papers

ISSN :
1815-2031 (online)
DOI :
10.1787/18152031
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The OECD Statistics Working Paper Series - managed by the OECD Statistics Directorate – is designed to make available in a timely fashion and to a wider readership selected studies prepared by staff in the Secretariat or by outside consultants working on OECD projects. The papers included are of a technical, methodological or statistical policy nature and relate to statistical work relevant to the organisation. The Working Papers are generally available only in their original language - English or French - with a summary in the other.

Joint Working Paper
Measuring Well-being and Progress in Countries at Different Stages of Development: Towards a More Universal Conceptual Framework (with OECD Development Centre)

 

A Framework to Measure the Progress of Societies You or your institution have access to this content

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Author(s):
Jon Hall1, Enrico Giovannini, Adolfo Morrone2, Giulia Ranuzzi1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: OECD, France

  • 2: Italian National Institute of Statistics, Italy

Publication Date
12 July 2010
Bibliographic information
No:
2010/05
Pages
27
DOI
10.1787/5km4k7mnrkzw-en

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Over the last three decades, a number of frameworks have been developed to promote and measure well-being, quality of life, human development and sustainable development. Some frameworks use a conceptual approach while others employ a consultative approach, and different initiatives to measure progress will require different frameworks. The aim of this paper is to present a proposed framework for measuring the progress of societies, and to compare it with other progress frameworks that are currently in use around the world. The framework does not aim to be definitive, but rather to suggest a common starting point that the authors believe is broad-based and flexible enough to be applied in many situations around the world. It is also the intention that the framework could be used to identify gaps in existing statistical standards and to guide work to fill these gaps.