United Nations Global Compact International Yearbook

English
Frequency
Annual
ISSN: 
2414-5440 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/4d52c309-en
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The aim of the Global Compact International Yearbook is to create a global overview of the achievements of the UN Global Compact. As an independent publication, it offers proactive and in-depth information on key sustainability issues to stakeholders and promotes unique and comprehensive knowledge exchange and learning in the spirit of the Global Compact principles. The publication helps to advance transparency, promotes the sharing of best-practices, and, perhaps most significantly, gives a strong voice to the regional and global actors that are at the heart of the initiative. Therefore, the yearbook includes good practice examples of corporate participants and showcases different approaches to the implementation of the ten principles. In addition, a substantial editorial framework will highlight major trends and issues, globally and regionally, placing the activities of Global Compact participants in a broader context.
 
The United Nations Global Compact International Yearbook 2015

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English
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Author(s):
UNGC
31 Dec 2015
Pages:
168
ISBN:
9789210577717 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/bb7953d3-en

Hide / Show Abstract

This publication gives a global overview of the achievements of the Global Compact. It offers proactive and in-depth information on key sustainability issues to stakeholders and promotes unique and comprehensive knowledge exchange and learning in the spirit of the Global Compact principles. It helps to advance transparency, promotes the sharing of best-practices, and gives a strong voice to the regional and global actors that are at the heart of the initiative. It includes good practice examples of corporate participants and showcases different approaches to the implementation of the ten principles. It highlights major trends and issues, placing the activities of Global Compact participants in a broader context.
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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts CSR in 2015

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    • Corporate sustainability in 2015
    • The State of CSR in 2015 and beyond
      Corporate social responsibility (CSR), in its modern formulation, has been most active since the 1960s – for more than half a century now. CSR has been defined in many ways. In my own framework, CSR embraces the economic, legal, ethical, and philanthropic expectations and responsibilities placed on businesses by society. Though CSR’s growth in the 2000s may appear to be moderate in light of pressing financial exigencies, it also is vying with competing and complementary frameworks and socially conscious semantics. Corporate citizenship, business ethics, stakeholder management, and sustainability are the primary variants of CSR contending for worldwide attention and acceptance. The concept of “creating shared value” has also entered the discussion. All these frameworks are interrelated and overlapping and are integral to CSR.
    • We need to change our thinking and our sense of urgency - Interview: Leonardo DiCaprio

      Leonardo DiCaprio may be one of the world’s top movie stars, but he would rather be defined and respected more for his work as a committed environmentalist. Over the years, he has personally funded as well as helped to raise tens of millions of dollars for a variety of green-related causes. He believes that his greatest legacy will be the progress he has helped make toward safeguarding the planet against the ravages of global warming, pollution, and species protection. Declares DiCaprio: “I’m equally as passionate about the environment as I am as an artist. As a teenager, I was interested in becoming a biologist or working in the environmental sciences.”

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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Global compact+15

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    • United Nations global compact 15th anniversary celebration
    • Clear message from the UN General Assembly: More support from businesses Is needed to achieve a better world
      During the United Nations Global Compact’s 15th anniversary event, global business leaders met with governments in the historic UN General Assembly Hall to demonstrate the growing, strategic role that the private sector plays in solving our world’s greatest challenges.
    • Lise Kingo appointed as new executive director
      On the cusp of the anniversary summit “Global Compact+15,” United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon announced the appointment of Lise Kingo as the new Executive Director of the initiative. She will succeed Georg Kell, who retires later this year after more than 25 years of service to the United Nations.
    • Sustainable value for stakeholders
      To mark the UN Global Compact’s 15th anniversary, we talked with Rev. Oliver Williams, Board member of the Foundation of the initiative, about achievements and criticism of the UNGC, the state of CSR and business ethics, and how some key arguments have evolved over the past.
    • The delisting dilemma
      The UN Global Compact is the world’s largest CSR initiative. Although the number of signatories increases year by year, a substantial number of signatories are delisted on a regular basis, as they fail to adhere to the Global Compact’s reporting policy. Over the total lifespan the initiative has acquired over 13,000 private-sector participants of which only 8,300 are still active. This is reason for concern. Although many solutions have been proposed for dealing with the issue, they have not been based on the facts and figures of the delisted companies. This article presents an analysis of the full sample of signatory companies since the initiative’s inception in 2000 up to the end of 2014, as provided by the Global Compact Office.
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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Financing sustainable development

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    • Giving strong signals of transformation
      This year provides an historic opportunity to recognize the benefits that a well-functioning environment brings to humanity in economic, societal, and cultural terms. World leaders will meet in September for the post-2015 development agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals, followed by the United Nations Climate Change Conference in December. In addition, in July, they will meet in Addis Ababa for the 3rd International Conference on Financing for Development. Discussions during the negotiations of these intergovernmental agreements point to the urgency of identifying scientifically sound and innovative solutions that build on the collaborative efforts of all stakeholders – governments, the business and finance community, and civil society at large.
    • Actions for private actors to scale-up private-sector involvement in sustainable development
    • Protagonists
    • Good practices around the world
    • Quotes
    • The odd courtship btween private equity and public causes
      Following the financial crisis in 2009 and the subsequent national debt crises, many countries around the world have had trouble using sustainability measures to stimulate capital markets. The time has come for private investors and private equity firms to show their responsibility to society. We discussed what we can expect from them with Prof. Dr. Oliver Gottschalg, a recognized expert in private equity.
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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Good practice

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    • Human rights
      The Central Romana Corporation Ltd., founded in 1912 in the eastern province of La Romana in the Dominican Republic, is an agro-industrial and tourism company whose main focus is sugar production. Having been in operation for more than 100 years, it has diversified its investments through a wide range of businesses that reach approximately 25,000 workers, and it regards itself as being the country’s largest private-sector employer.
    • Labour standards
      In 2012, the French economy had been stagnant for close to five years. The country’s economic and social position was severe, from the decline of industry and the state of public finances to the number one concern of the French people: unemployment, which was at a 15-year high. Adecco, the leading provider of HR solutions globally and in France, was determined to tackle the problem head on, by launching a three-year job-creation initiative: ‘La Chaîne du OUI’. The aim? To create 270,000 sustainable new jobs, motivating clients, our employees, and other organizations across France to step up to the challenge.
    • Environment
    • CSR management
      For 150 years, BASF has been creating chemistry to find new and better solutions for its customers. Following its company purpose – “We create chemistry for a sustainable future” – BASF is focusing on chemical innovations that help customers contribute to sustainability. To meet customer needs even better in the future and to secure long-term business success, BASF has set itself the target to further increase this share of sustainable solutions. BASF has analyzed and evaluated the sustainability aspects of its entire product portfolio and established a new process for steering its portfolio based on sustainability criteria. Already in 2014, 23 percent of global sales were generated by innovative products and solutions with a significant contribution toward sustainability in its application.
    • Development
      The Social Impact Management methodology aims to integrate Social Impact Management into all levels of the process of identifying opportunities as well as bidding on and executing projects at ACCIONA, with a proactive focus on a commitment to the communities in which it operates.
    • Financial markets
      The banking sector in Egypt represents 57 percent of the private sector’s overall capacity. The sector’s capacity and capital enable a drive for change and make an industry movement possible. Only four banks in Egypt are state-owned, whereas others are joint ventures. Since 2004, privatization and economic reforms, especially in the banking sector, have spurred active engagement and responsibility toward communities and in the country at large. The banking sector’s current capacity and capital remain significant when comparing its role in social and environment development. The Arab African International Bank (AAIB)’s experience offers a successful trendsetting model concerning the role of banks in affecting the growth of new industries and the economy at large.
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  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Voluntary sustainability standards

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    • An Introduction to Voluntary Sustainability Standards
      Private, voluntary sustainability standards are an innovative, market-based approach to promoting sustainable production and business practices. Adoption of these sustainability standards is intended to be voluntary: The standards are not created, run, or required by governments or government regulation. Instead, the system for voluntary sustainability standards are nongovernment initiatives that seek to drive sustainable production and consumption by creating a market demand for sustainable products, and a supply to meet that demand. They help buyers (both consumers and businesses) identify sustainably-produced products, and they guide producers, forest managers, mine and tourism operators, and factory owners and others in their choice of sustainable practices.
    • Evolution of the Voluntary Sustainability Standards
    • Different Kinds of Voluntary Sustainability Standards
    • Selected Voluntary Standard Systems at a Glance
    • The Objectives of Standards and How Firms Use Them
      Although often lumped together, the many voluntary sustainability standards (VSS) used today are not at all alike. As a whole they do tend to deal with the areas not functionally addressed by most firms and global trading structures. Some of the fastest-growing and more prevalent sustainability standards are Fairtrade International and Fair Trade USA, Forest Stewardship Council, Rainforest Alliance, and UTZ Certified.
    • The Meta-Governanceof Voluntary Sustainability Standards
      There has been a surge in the popularity of the private standardssetting approach to social and environmental governance in recent decades. A single economic sector may now literally feature dozens of competing voluntary sustainability standards. Emerging gradually as a result of the uncoordinated efforts of various independently operating (coalitions of) actors, the rise of voluntary standards-setting has been largely spontaneous and unplanned. The resulting system of governance is generally characterized by the absence of strategic linkages between the various standards initiatives. Although this multiplicity does have its advantages, the relatively uncoordinated coexistence of multiple competing schemes also results in an unnecessary duplication of efforts and may undermine the stringency of standards programs, lead to consumer (and producer) confusion and skepticism, and exacerbate third-party concerns regarding the credibility and legitimacy of (private) voluntary sustainability standards and certification schemes.
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