Transnational Corporations

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3 times a year
ISSN: 
2076-099X (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/d3e73f33-en
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This journal takes a fresh look at major legal, sectorial, regional and environmental issues facing corporations operating internationally. Released three times a year, it provides in-depth policy-oriented research findings on significant issues relating to the activities of transnational corporations.
 

Volume 22, Issue 1 You do not have access to this content

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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/e724d84a-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/transnational-corporations/volume-22/issue-1_e724d84a-en
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14 Dec 2015
ISBN:
9789210571906 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/e724d84a-en

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  14 Dec 2015
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/11ac225b-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/governance-transparency-among-the-largest-multinational-corporations-influence-of-firm-industry-and-national-factors_11ac225b-en
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Governance transparency among the largest multinational corporations: Influence of firm, industry and national factors
Raj Aggarwal, John W. Goodell
Using the Transparency in Corporate Reporting index from Transparency International, this paper examines the factors that influence the transparency of the world’s largest multinational corporations (MNCs). Our results show that while firm and industry characteristics are important, so is MNC nationality. Somewhat surprisingly, lower MNC transparency is associated with a higher market-to-book ratio, the finance and technology industries, higher national GDP, English legal origin, greater national emphasis on market (rather than bank) financing, and the cultural dimensions of uncertainty avoidance, power distance and masculinity. Higher levels of transparency are associated with individualism. In sum, we find that home country characteristics remain important in determining the transparency of even the world’s largest MNCs.
  14 Dec 2015
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/34aec3e7-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/problems-of-regulatory-governance-in-the-mining-sector-in-asia_34aec3e7-en
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Problems of regulatory governance in the mining sector in Asia
Terry O’Callaghan, Vlado Vivoda
This paper analyses the governance of foreign mining investment in the Asia-Pacific region. After surveying relevant literature on regulatory regimes, the paper draws on the seminal work by Stern and Holder (1999) to evaluate the regulatory issues in China, India, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and the Philippines. Our analyses indicate six key regional challenges: regulatory overlap, regulatory capture and a lack of independence from government, lack of impartiality, lack of transparency, inadequate stakeholder engagement and access to regulator, and a lack of institutional capacity. These issues are more pronounced in some countries than in others. Finally, policy implications which may aide regional governments to improve governance infrastructure in their mining sectors are outlined.
  14 Dec 2015
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/cb23bcf9-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/the-changing-fdi-landscape-in-asean_cb23bcf9-en
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The Changing FDI Landscape in ASEAN
Kee Hwee Wee, Hafiz Mirza
In 2011, FDI flows to ASEAN rose to a record level of $114 billion and inward FDI stock exceeded $1 trillion for the first time. Growth in FDI flows to the region is likely to have slowed in 2012 against the backdrop of a significant global FDI decline, but the medium-term prospect remains positive. Strong growth in FDI flows has been due to favourable economic conditions, regional integration and an improving policy environment. ASEAN is a key player in global supply chains in an increasing range of product categories. ASEAN’s FDI landscape is fast changing with a number of significant developments, most notably regional integration. Zero tariffs on intra-ASEAN trade reduce costs of doing business and facilitate regional production networks. FDI landscape in ASEAN is changing as the sectors and source economies have diversified. The development of the M&A environment is leading to a rapid growth in the number and value of M&A transactions. Enterprise regionalization rose to a new record level, with $26 billion of intra-regional investments. The list of regional players is expanding and covering a wide range of industries. ASEAN TNCs are internationalizing through M&As, which highlight their growing financial capacity. The key drivers and motivations of ASEAN enterprise regionalization and internationalization are the need to maintain and increase their competitiveness.
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