Transnational Corporations

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3 times a year
ISSN: 
2076-099X (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/d3e73f33-en
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This journal takes a fresh look at major legal, sectorial, regional and environmental issues facing corporations operating internationally. Released three times a year, it provides in-depth policy-oriented research findings on significant issues relating to the activities of transnational corporations.
 

Volume 21, Issue 3 You do not have access to this content

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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/389b6790-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/transnational-corporations/volume-21/issue-3_389b6790-en
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14 Dec 2015
ISBN:
9789210571890 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/389b6790-en

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  14 Dec 2015
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/e7307157-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/the-use-of-non-equity-modalities-and-host-country-impact-some-evidence-from-the-international-hotel-industry-and-areas-of-further-research_e7307157-en
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The use of non-equity modalities and host-country impact: Some evidence from the international hotel industry and areas of further research
Simona Gentile-Lüdecke, Sarianna M. Lundan
This paper provides preliminary evidence on the use of non-equity modalities by transnational corporations in the hotel industry and discusses the conditions that may favour the choice of one of these modalities as a substitute for foreign direct investment. Based on secondary data and interviews with experts of the hospitality industry, the study looks at the expansion of the major international hotel chains and focuses on the issues of control, transferability of resources and institutional framework to explain the choice of a non-equity governance form. Concentrating on three of the main growth markets in the hospitality sector, China, India and the United Arab Emirates, the study highlights some implications of non-equity modalities in terms of host country impact, emphasizing the issues of skill development, knowledge transfer and procurement linkages, and identifies areas for further research.
  14 Dec 2015
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/adding-value-in-global-value-chains_dd847f8a-en
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Adding value in Global Value Chains
Rashmi Banga
This paper compares alternative ways of measuring a country’s participation in Global Value Chains (GVCs) and estimates the distribution of total value added created under. Using the OECD-WTO database on Trade in Value Added, this paper shows that 67 per cent of total global value added created by trade under GVCs accrue to the OECD countries while the share of emerging economies (the NIEs and BRICS countries) is 25 per cent. Other developing countries account for only 8 per cent. The paper discusses external and internal constraints to adding value in GVCs by developing countries and identifies capacities that need to be developed by developing countries in order to gainfully link into GVCs.
  14 Dec 2015
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/ec2b4828-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/unctad-eora-global-value-chain-database-methodology-and-further-research-agenda_ec2b4828-en
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UNCTAD-EORA Global Value Chain Database: methodology and further research agenda
UNCTAD
The objective of this note is to explain the methodology for compiling the UNCTAD-EORA Global Value Chain (GVC) database. The data are generated from the multi-region input-output table assembled by the EORA project. The computation for measuring trade in value added data follows the widely accepted procedure, as described in Koopman et al. (2010). The differences between the UNCTAD-EORA database and other attempts to measure trade in value added arise from the coverage, the method for compiling the input-output table and the treatment of “reflected domestic value added”. This note concludes by highlighting challenges in interpreting the resulting, especially the issues arising from the prevalence of trade in capital goods (fixed assets) and crossborder flows of financial capital.
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