Africa Renewal

Frequency
3 times a year
ISSN: 
2517-9829 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/25582e53-en
Hide / Show Abstract

The Africa Renewal magazine examines the many issues that confront the people of Africa, its leaders and its international partners: sustainable development goals, economic reform, debt, education, health, women's empowerment, conflict and civil strife, democratization, investment, trade, regional integration and many other topics. It tracks policy debates. It provides expert analysis and on-the-spot reporting to show how those policies affect people on the ground. And, it highlights the views of policy-makers, non-governmental leaders and others actively involved in efforts to transform Africa and improve its prospects in the world today. The magazine also reports on and examines the many different aspects of the United Nations’ involvement in Africa, especially within the framework of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD).

Also available in French
Article
 

Safeguarding Africa’s fishing waters You do not have access to this content

English
 
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/6d995a4b-en.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/safeguarding-africa-s-fishing-waters_6d995a4b-en
  • READ
Author(s):
Mary Kimani
31 July 2009
Pages:
3
Bibliographic information
No.:
5,
Volume:
23,
Issue:
2
Pages:
10–12
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/6d995a4b-en

Hide / Show Abstract

Every day hundreds of unlicensed fishing vessels enter African waters and trawl for shrimp, sardines, tuna, and mackerel. According to a study commissioned by the UK’s aid agency, such trawlers are costing Africa some $1 bn every year. But illegal fishing “is not just an African problem,” says Arona Soumare, the West Africa conservation director for the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). Many countries, even developed states with substantial marine security forces, struggle to keep unlicensed fishing vessels from their waters. However, Mr. Soumare notes, in comparison to developed countries, “the social and economic impact of such losses on Africa are huge.” The funds that African countries lose to illegal fishing are “a potential source of income” that they “can ill afford to be without.”
Also available in French