Asia-Pacific Development Journal

Frequency
Semiannual
ISSN: 
2411-9873 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/cb961558-en
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The Asia-Pacific Development Journal (APDJ) is published twice a year by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific. The primary objective of the APDJ is to provide a platform for the exchange of knowledge, experience, ideas, information and data on all aspects of economic and social development issues and concerns facing the region and aims to stimulate policy debate and assist policy formulation. The APDJ provides a scholarly means for bringing together research work by eminent social scientists and development practitioners from the region and beyond for use by a variety of stakeholders. The Journal aims to stimulate policy debate and assist policy formulation in the region.
Article
 

Openness and technological innovation in East Asia: have they increased the demand for skills? You do not have access to this content

English
 
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/91b13005-en.pdf
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Author(s):
Rita K. Almeida
17 Apr 2012
Pages:
33
Bibliographic information
No.:
3,
Volume:
17,
Issue:
1
Pages:
63–95
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/91b13005-en

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This paper examines whether the increased openness and technological innovation in East Asia have contributed to an increased demand for skills in the region. We explore a unique firm level data set across eight countries in the East Asia and Pacific region. Our results strongly support the idea that greater openness and technological innovation have increased the demand for skills, especially in middle-income countries. In particular, while the presence in international markets has been skill enhancing for most middle-income countries, this is not the case for manufacturing firms operating in China and in low-income countries. We interpret this to be supporting the premise that, if international integration in the region continues to intensify and technology continues to be skilled biased, policies aimed at mitigating the skills shortages should produce continual and persistent increase in skills.