Evaluation of the Contribution of UNDP Global and Regional Human Development Reports to the Public Policy Process
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Evaluation of the Contribution of UNDP Global and Regional Human Development Reports to the Public Policy Process

The Evaluation of the Contribution of UNDP Global and Regional Human Development Reports (HDRs) to the Public Policy Process is an independent thematic evaluation conducted by the Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in 2014. It assesses the contribution of global and regional HDRs to public policy and policy discourse from 2004 to 2013. This is the first independent evaluation of the global and regional HDRs, so the evaluation also considers the way that HDRs progressed from 1990 to 2003. UNDP’s Executive Board approved this evaluation, taking particular note of the HDRs’ important advocacy role in promoting the human development perspective in development policy and planning. In addition to accountability and learning objectives, the evaluation focuses attention on the public policy and pedagogical value of these flagship UNDP knowledge products
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Contribution of Global HDRs - Conclusions and recommendations You do not have access to this content

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UNDP

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Since 1990, 23 global HDRs have been published. Some excellent reports have contributed to transformative debate. The human development paradigm used in the reports made them distinct from other publications. Over the years, the number of other development organizations’ flagship publications has increased, with several organizations publishing their own annual publications that cover comparable development themes. Similar to the publications of other international organizations, it has been harder for the global HDRs to consistently retain a niche in development thought leadership and to ensure that they capture the interest of key development actors. The conclusions and recommendations presented here draw from the findings of the use, utility and contributions of global HDRs to public debate and public policy processes.