Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific 2016
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Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific 2016

Nurturing Productivity for Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Development

The Survey 2016 assesses the region’s outlook as it navigates through global uncertainties, providing policy options and strategies to support countries in striving towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. The report analyses a wide range of areas including economic growth, inflation, trade and investment, financial markets, inequality, employment, and environmental concerns. The special theme of Survey 2016 highlights how both economic growth and productivity growth have declined in the aftermath of the 2008 economic and financial crisis in the Asia-Pacific region. In doing so, the report examines underlying trends of productivity growth and argues that the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development provides an entry point to strengthen productivity as investing in the SDGs can foster productivity growth, thereby creating a virtuous cycle between sustainable development, productivity and development.
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ESCAP

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The year 2016 represents a historic milestone in global development policymaking as it marks the beginning of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development which, with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals and many targets, provides a comprehensive and universal framework for development policy over the coming 15 years. This is also an opportune time to rethink the region’s development strategy, its overreliance on exports destined for developed economies and more recently the extent of the sharp increase in private sector debt leverage. With the centre of economic gravity continuing to move eastwards, it is time for the Asia-Pacific region to adopt a development model that relies more on domestic and regional demand that, among other things, nurtures inclusiveness, equality and social stability.