Assessment of Development Results

English
ISSN: 
2518-3192 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/cc1e98b9-en
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This series assesses the attainment of intended and achieved results as well as United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) contributions to development results at the country level. Their scope include, but is not confined to, UNDP responsiveness and alignment to country challenges and priorities; strategic positioning; use of comparative advantage; and engagement with partners. The number and selection of countries, and the timing of these evaluations, are determined to ensure coverage and to allow findings and recommendations to feed into the preparation of the subsequent programme. Wherever possible, these evaluations will be conducted in conjunction with other United Nations organizations.

 
Assessment of Development Results - Pacific Island Countries

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English
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Author(s):
UNDP
31 Dec 2012
Pages:
134
ISBN:
9789210550000 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/0f4bad45-en

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This report presents an independent regional evaluation conducted by the UNDP Evaluation Office in 2010. The evaluation examines the strategic relevance and positioning of UNDP support, and its contribution to the development of Pacific Island Countries (PICs) including 14 PICs scattered all over the Pacific Ocean. The report is the first independent country-level evaluation conducted by the Evaluation Office of the United Nations Development Programme in the Pacific Island Countries (PICs).

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  • Acknowledgements
  • Foreword
  • Acronyms and abbreviations
  • Executive summary

    The Assessment of Development Results (ADR) in the Pacific is an independent evaluation conducted in 2011 by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Evaluation Office. The objective of the ADR Pacific is to assess UNDP’s contributions to development results in the Pacific subregion and how the organization has positioned itself to support and add value to the development efforts of the Pacific Island Countries (PICs). It was timed to be conducted in 2011 so that its findings and conclusions can inform the process of formulation of the new multi-country programmes in the Pacific beginning in 2013.

  • Introduction

    The Evaluation Office (EO) of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) conducted an Assessment of Development Results in the Pacific Island Countries (ADR Pacific) in 2011. ADRs are conducted to capture and demonstrate evaluative evidence of UNDP’s contributions to development results at the country level, as well as the effectiveness of UNDP’s strategy in facilitating and leveraging national effort for achieving development goals. ADRs are carried out within the overall provisions contained in the UNDP Evaluation Policy, following the methodology developed by EO for ADRs.

  • Subregional development context

    The Pacific Subregion, spanning approximately 6,000 miles across the Pacific Ocean from the east to west, is composed of 22 small island countries and territories, of which 14 are covered by UNDP programmes. The coverage excludes the American Samoa, French Polynesia, Guam, New Caledonia, Northern Mariana Islands, Pitcairn, and Wallis and Futuna. The countries and territories are also classified in three different clusters: Polynesia (Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu), Melanesia (Fiji, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu), and Micronesia (Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, F.S. Micronesia, Palau). The subregion is geographically vast and culturally and ecologically diverse. Each one of the countries/ territories has its own character and particularities. They have varying land size, population, natural resource endowments, economy, income levels, cultures, physical attributes, colonial heritages, languages, degrees of social cohesion, and economic and social policies. While the region has a mix of middle income and Least Developed Countries (LDCs), it also reflects a wide variability in human development terms.

  • The United Nations and UNDP in the Pacific

    UNDP is highly visible in the Pacific and since 2003, it has adapted its strategy and approach in responding to a myriad of challenges facing the region. There are currently 17 UN agencies, programmes and offices working in the Pacific subregion. In Fiji, there are 13 UN agencies, programmes and offices and in Samoa there are six. Each UN body has its own representative, head or coordinator.

  • Contribution of UNDP to development results
  • Strategic positioning

    The Fiji and Samoa Multi-Country Programme Documents (MCPD) for the periods 2003-2007 and 2008-2012 addressed a subregional development agenda relevant to all 14 countries and presented an overarching strategic programme focus as a basis for individual country projects and initiatives. The alignment of UNDPfunded programmes and projects with the needs and priorities of the governments was ensured through close and iterative consultations with the governments of the Pacific island countries. The governments across the Pacific appreciated this consultative nature of programme development. The MCPDs bear a close alignment with country priorities as reflected in national development plans, the MDGs, the regional UNDAF 2008-2012 and the Pacific Plan for regional integration and cooperation.

  • Conclusions and recommendations

    In the Pacific, UNDP has consistently provided development assistance as a conscientious partner to support the development challenges of the PICs. It is serving a wide variety of countries with multi-faceted development needs. The UNDP MCOs face a daunting challenge of maximizing effectiveness and efficiency with many limitations of resources (both financial and human), capacity constraints and complexities of distance, spread of coverage, and diversity.

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    • Terms of reference

      The Evaluation Office (EO) of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) conducts evaluations called Assessments of Development Results (ADRs) to capture and demonstrate evaluative evidence of UNDP’s contributions to development results at the country level, as well as the effectiveness of UNDP’s strategy in facilitating and leveraging national effort for achieving development goals. ADRs are carried out within the overall provisions contained in the UNDP Evaluation Policy, following the methodology developed by the EO for ADRs.

    • Evaluation matrix
    • Sample of projects
    • People consulted
    • Documents consulted
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