Asia-Pacific Development Journal

Frequency
Semiannual
ISSN: 
2411-9873 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/cb961558-en
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The Asia-Pacific Development Journal (APDJ) is published twice a year by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific. The primary objective of the APDJ is to provide a platform for the exchange of knowledge, experience, ideas, information and data on all aspects of economic and social development issues and concerns facing the region and aims to stimulate policy debate and assist policy formulation. The APDJ provides a scholarly means for bringing together research work by eminent social scientists and development practitioners from the region and beyond for use by a variety of stakeholders. The Journal aims to stimulate policy debate and assist policy formulation in the region.
 

Volume 20, Issue 1 You do not have access to this content

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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/asia-pacific-development-journal/volume-20/issue-1_8bcd76f3-en
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18 Oct 2013
ISBN:
9789210562959 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/8bcd76f3-en

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  18 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/d1804dcf-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/the-economic-impact-of-new-regional-trading-developments-in-the-escap-region_d1804dcf-en
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The economic impact of new regional trading developments in the ESCAP region
John Gilbert
In this paper the results of a number of numerical simulations of possible trade liberalization scenarios in the ESCAP region are presented. The scenarios considered include: expansion of existing trade blocs to encompass new members; consolidation and deepening of existing trade agreements; and a region-wide free trade area. The simulations were conducted using the model of the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) and were based on a projection of the database to 2010.
  18 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/db21aee1-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/dynamics-in-human-development-partial-mobility-and-jump_db21aee1-en
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Dynamics in human development: Partial mobility and “jump”
Atanu Sengupta, Abhijit Ghosh
Development economists have argued that interesting dynamics exist in the intergroup movement of countries in terms of several development parameters. However, standard mobility measures are aggregative in nature. They do not study intergroup variation in mobility. In an earlier paper, we have introduced the concept of partial mobility for analysing the movement of a particular group. In this paper, the degree to which the group has progressed (or declined) from its current position is measured. It is argued that any movement is not sufficient to enhance (or worsen) a group’s welfare. There is a perceived threshold, and any movement above that threshold may be defined as “jump”. The focus of this paper is jumps, not just mobility. Jump is characterized with a set of axioms. The analysis of global data reveals that the poor countries fail to cross a threshold level, although there may be some limited movement within a narrow limit.
  18 Oct 2013
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/matching-resources-with-demand-a-flawed-strategy_a7505f98-en
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Matching resources with demand: A flawed strategy?
Ashfaq Ahmad Khan, Wiqar Ahmad
An organization’s survival depends largely on its capacity to withstand external “reorganizing” attempts. Little research, if any, has so far been undertaken examining the survival of an entire business sector where its constituents undergo an externally dictated change and as a result it runs a risk of a thorough “jolt” or even “demise”. The authors present empirical evidence that a business sector may be subjected to “unwanted” re-organizing by its “parent/controlling” entity, and may cease to exist, in its real essence, if its constituents are forced to undergo a change that will alter the very objectives upon which their existence rests.
  18 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/044795d6-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/perpetuating-the-global-division-of-labour-defensive-free-trade-and-development-in-the-third-world_044795d6-en
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Perpetuating the global division of labour: Defensive free trade and development in the third world
Yakub Halabi
This article contains an examination of whether free trade coupled with the neoliberal principles of the Washington Consensus has been turned into a defensive strategy used by developed countries in order to maintain and perpetuate the division of labour in the global market between developed and developing countries. The question is raised of whether developed countries are worried that some highly populated emerging economies may follow the path of the newly industrialized economies. As a pre-emptive measure, developed countries adopt free trade as a defensive mechanism that would create a level playing field or “fair trade” in the global market and would deliberately stifle infant, high value added industries from thriving within emerging economies. On a level playing field, infant industries cannot compete against the wellestablished corporations of developed countries. Finally, free trade also leads to another indirect outcome: it intensifies competition among developing economies in low value added goods and consequently lessens a rise in the income of unskilled labour in these economies.
  18 Oct 2013
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/financing-young-and-elderly-dependents-the-case-of-indian-public-policy_986b92f9-en
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Financing young and elderly dependents: The case of Indian public policy
Laishram Ladusingh
In this paper the author explores the monetary benefits of young and elderly dependents under the public policy that introduced age into the National Accounts of India, the framework of the National Transfer Accounts. The results of the study indicate that the net monetary gain of young dependents is more than seven times higher than that of elderly dependents. It is suggested that there is a need to reorient the country’s fiscal policy in order to meet the demand for sustainable social security in the face of impending population ageing in the decades ahead. A desirable policy strategy would be to convert all social assistance programmes into a single long-term national social security programme, the scope of which would encompass various aspects of intergenerational equity, raise the level of entitlement to match actual need and make national social security a universal programme.
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