Asia-Pacific Development Journal

Frequency
Semiannual
ISSN: 
2411-9873 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/cb961558-en
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The Asia-Pacific Development Journal (APDJ) is published twice a year by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific. The primary objective of the APDJ is to provide a platform for the exchange of knowledge, experience, ideas, information and data on all aspects of economic and social development issues and concerns facing the region and aims to stimulate policy debate and assist policy formulation. The APDJ provides a scholarly means for bringing together research work by eminent social scientists and development practitioners from the region and beyond for use by a variety of stakeholders. The Journal aims to stimulate policy debate and assist policy formulation in the region.
 

Volume 19, Issue 2 You do not have access to this content

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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/asia-pacific-development-journal/volume-19/issue-2_2bb2a30a-en
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15 Apr 2013
ISBN:
9789210560054 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/2bb2a30a-en

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  15 Apr 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/e7cfd1ec-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/is-climate-change-hindering-economic-growth-of-asian-economies_e7cfd1ec-en
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Is climate change hindering economic growth of Asian economies?
Naeem Akram
Asia is recognized as one of the most vulnerable regions to climate change on the planet. With approximately 60 per cent of world’s population residing in Asia, this phenomenon presents serious concerns for policymakers in the region. The present study analyses the impacts of climate change on economic growth for selected Asian countries during the period 1972-2009. A growth model has been developed by incorporating temperature and precipitation as proxies for climate change in the production function and a fixed effect model (FEM) and seemingly unrelated regression (SUR) have been used to estimate the model. The results reveal that economic growth is negatively affected by changes in temperature, precipitation and population growth whereas urbanization and human development stimulates economic growth. The results also indicate that agriculture is the most vulnerable sector to climate change and manufacturing is the least affected sector.
  15 Apr 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/e7c7bcb7-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/public-spending-on-education-health-care-and-economic-growth-in-selected-countries-of-asia-and-the-pacific_e7c7bcb7-en
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Public spending on education, health care and economic growth in selected countries of Asia and the Pacific
Biswajit Maitra, C. K. Mukhopadhyay
In this paper the role of public spending on the education and health sectors is examined with regard to promoting the gross domestic product (GDP) of 12 countries in Asia and the Pacific over the last three decades. In six of those countries, namely Bangladesh, Kiribati, Malaysia, Maldives, the Philippines and the Republic of Korea, Johansen cointegration tests confirmed the existence of cointegrating relations. In the remaining countries, namely Fiji, Nepal, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Tonga and Vanuatu, cointegrating relations were absent. The causal impact of education and health-care spending on GDP was further examined in the study. Education spending was found to have raised GDP in Bangladesh, Fiji, Kiribati, Maldives, Nepal, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Tonga and Vanuatu. On the other hand, health-care spending contributed to GDP growth in Bangladesh, Nepal, the Philippines, Singapore and Sri Lanka. In the Philippines spending on education had a negative impact on GDP, while in Kiribati, Maldives and Vanuatu, the impact of health-care spending on GDP was found to be negative. In the case of Malaysia and the Republic of Korea, neither education spending nor health-care spending exhibited an appreciable impact on GDP. It was also found that the gestation lag of education spending was longer than that of health-care spending.
  15 Apr 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/baf1ef41-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/obstacles-to-bank-financing-of-micro-and-small-enterprises-empirical-evidence-from-the-pacific-with-some-policy-implications_baf1ef41-en
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Obstacles to bank financing of micro and small enterprises: Empirical evidence from the Pacific with some policy implications
Parmendra Sharma, Neelesh Gounder
In recognizing on one hand the importance of the micro and small enterprise (MSE) sector for the growth and development of economies in the Pacific subregion and on the other, the financing constraints of the sector, the authors surveyed a group of MSEs in a Pacific island country and found that the sector may be particularly constrained by bank interest rates, fees and charges, and collateral requirements. This situation holds implications for policy, and the authors propose an initiative led by the banking sector to improve the situation. Keeping in mind an economy’s specific financial, regulatory, economic and other structures and circumstances, voluntary or mandatory, it seems as if direct or indirect bank involvement appears vital. The implications for economic growth and development are considerable.
  15 Apr 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/9eb232aa-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/the-environmental-kuznets-curve-in-asia-the-case-of-sulphur-and-carbon-emissions_9eb232aa-en
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The environmental kuznets curve in Asia: The case of sulphur and carbon emissions
Hiroyuki Taguchi
The present study examines whether the Race to the Bottom and Revised EKC scenarios presented by Dasgupta and others (2002) are, with regard to the analytical framework of the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC), applicable in Asia to representative environmental indices, such as sulphur emissions and carbon emissions. To carry out this study, a generalized method of moments (GMM) estimation was made, using panel data of 19 economies for the period 1950-2009. The main findings of the analysis on the validity of EKC indicate that sulphur emissions follow the expected inverted U-shape pattern, while carbon emissions tend to increase in line with per capita income in the observed range. As for the Race to the Bottom and Revised EKC scenarios, the latter was verified in sulphur emissions, as their EKC trajectories represent a linkage of the later development of the economy with the lower level of emissions while the former one was not present in neither sulphur nor carbon emissions.
  15 Apr 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/671d744f-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/economic-and-social-development/challenges-and-opportunities-for-protecting-geographical-indications-in-thailand_671d744f-en
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Challenges and opportunities for protecting geographical indications in Thailand
Chuthaporn Ngokkuen, Ulrike Grote
In this paper, the legal framework for the protection of geographical indications (GIs) in Thailand is analysed and challenges the country has been facing in that regard are discussed. Although the legal protection of GIs is ensured by the World Trade Organization, unresolved issues remain concerning GI protection in Thailand. Biopiracy, existing conflicts of interests concerning different types of intellectual property rights (trademarks and patents versus GIs) and the rise in regional and bilateral trade agreements have created major challenges at the multilateral level. In drawing on GI cases in Thailand, in particular that concerning jasmine rice, an attempt is made to further analyse these challenges to protect genetic resources from the perspective of Thailand. This paper concludes with suggestions on how such challenges can be mitigated and in which direction trade negotiations should be shaped.
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