OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews

English
ISSN: 
2309-7132 (online)
ISSN: 
2309-7124 (print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/23097132
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The OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC) conducts periodic reviews of the individual development co-operation efforts of DAC members. The policies and programmes of each DAC member are critically examined approximately once every five years. DAC peer reviews assess the development co-operation performance across government of a given member and examine policy, finance and implementation. They take an integrated, system-wide view of the development co-operation and humanitarian assistance activities and seek input from a wide range of stakeholders – civil society, parliament, private sector and partner countries.

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OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: The Netherlands 2017

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English
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/4317051e.pdf
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Author(s):
OECD
28 June 2017
Pages:
117
ISBN:
9789264278363 (PDF) ;9789264278356(print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264278363-en

Hide / Show Abstract

The OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC) conducts periodic reviews of the individual development co-operation efforts of DAC members. The policies and programmes of each DAC member are critically examined approximately once every five years. DAC peer reviews assess the development co-operation performance across government of a given member and examine policy, finance and implementation. They take an integrated, system-wide view of the development co-operation and humanitarian assistance activities and seek input from a wide range of stakeholders – civil society, parliament, private sector and partner countries.
This review assesses the performance of the Netherlands, including looking at its integrated aid, trade and investment policy focus, and its approach to partnerships.

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  • Conducting the peer review

    The OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) conducts periodic reviews of the individual development co-operation efforts of DAC members. The policies and programmes of each member are critically examined approximately once every five years. Five members are examined annually. The OECD Development Co-operation Directorate provides analytical support, and develops and maintains, in close consultation with the Committee, the methodology and analytical framework – known as the Reference Guide – within which the peer reviews are undertaken.

  • Abbreviations and acronyms
  • The Netherlands' aid at a glance
  • Context of the Netherlands' peer review

    A coalition government of the centre-right Liberals (VVD) and the centre-left Labour Party (PvdA) took office in the Netherlands after a snap election in September 2012. Elections were held in March 2017 and a new coalition government is being formed, led by the VVD.

  • The DAC's main findings and recommendations
  • Towards a comprehensive Netherlands' development effort

    The Netherlands takes a broad and strategic approach to international development, which is increasingly aligned to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and responds rapidly to new opportunities and challenges. The Netherlands uses its European Union (EU) membership to promote issues of importance to developing economies within the EU and globally.

  • The Netherlands' vision and policies for development co-operation

    A World to Gain guides the Netherlands’ development co-operation programme with a clear vision and direction, set within the country’s broader foreign policy and trade objectives. Theories of change are useful in shaping the Netherlands’ thematic priorities, which form the backbone of the new policy. The policy introduced significant reductions in the ODA budget. The absence of legislation covering the purpose and volume of ODA leaves the development co-operation programme vulnerable in a contested political space.

  • Allocating the Netherlands' official development assistance

    After a 30-year record of exceeding the UN target of allocating 0.7% of gross national income as official development assistance (ODA), the Netherlands’ ODA began to fluctuate in 2013, and the overall trend is now downwards. The composition of the ODA budget has changed – the costs of hosting refugees in the Netherlands have markedly reduced the volume and quality of resources available for overseas programmes. There has been no recommitment by the Dutch government to the UN target and the government has no plan in place to restore ODA levels.

  • Managing the Netherlands' development co-operation

    Since the last peer review there have been many changes to how the Netherlands' development co-operation system is organised and managed. These changes reflect new policy directions and have improved systems for managing development co-operation. However, Dutch embassies' declining role, resources and influence are undermining development effectiveness.

  • The Netherlands' development co-operation delivery and partnerships

    The Netherlands is seeking to add flexibility, ensure policy relevance, and seek synergies across portfolios in its budgeting and programming. However, the gradual shift away from the partner country, and towards themes and actors as the modus operandi, has affected development effectiveness – notably predictability, alignment and use of country systems – as well as overall sustainability. Risks are well analysed but not systematically managed or monito

  • Results management and accountability of the Netherlands' development co-operation

    The Netherlands is putting in place an ambitious new framework for tracking the impact of its development co-operation. The aim is to improve the use of information on its results for learning and decision making, as well as for accountability and communications. This is work in progress. The new framework should be flexible enough to align with partner countries’ own results frameworks. More work is needed to measure results in the field, disaggregate data on target beneficiaries, and ensure clear links between Dutch programmes and impacts.

  • The Netherlands' humanitarian assistance

    The Netherlands has kept pace with dramatic changes in the global context for humanitarian assistance over the past few years, adapting its practice and creating innovative mechanisms to deliver coherent and efficient humanitarian aid. The good practice embodied in the Dutch Relief Fund, for example, needs to be secured for the longer term. Updating the humanitarian policy now will safeguard this mechanism as well as consolidate progress towards the Netherlands’ World Humanitarian Summit commitments.

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