Development Co-operation Report

English
Frequency
Annual
ISSN: 
2074-7721 (online)
ISSN: 
2074-773X (print)
DOI: 
10.1787/20747721
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The annual report of the Chairman of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC). It provides detailed statistics on and analysis of each member’s foreign aid programmes (offical development assistance - ODA) as well as an overview of trends and issues currently being discussed in the development community.

Also available in French, German
 
Development Co-operation Report 2017

Forthcoming

Development Co-operation Report 2017

Data for Development You or your institution have access to this content

English
Author(s):
OECD
30 Oct 2017
ISBN:
9789264274464(print)
DOI: 
10.1787/dcr-2017-en

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Ninety per cent of all the world’s data were generated in the last two years alone. “Big data” and the “Internet of things” are more than buzzwords: the data revolution is transforming the way economies and societies are functioning across the planet. This is an opportunity that should not to be missed: more and better data can help boost inclusive growth, fight inequalities and combat climate change. These data are also essential to measure and monitor progress against the Sustainable Development  Goals.
 
The value of data in enabling development is uncontested. Yet, we still lack good quality data in most developing countries. Why are over half of deaths and one-third of births worldwide unaccounted for? Why is investment in statistical capacity - 0.25% of ODA - not a priority for most providers of development assistance?

There is a need for stronger political leadership, greater investment and more collective action to bridge the data divide. This report makes a strong business case for strengthening national statistical systems. With the unfolding data revolution, developing countries and donors have a unique chance to act now to boost data production and use for the benefit of citizens. This volume sets out a number of priority steps and good practices that will help policy makers and providers of development assistance to make data work for development.

The profiles of providers of development co-operation (Part II of this report) are already available. The full report will be released in October 2017.

Also available in French
  • Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Profiles of development co-operation providers

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    • Development finance and policy trends

      This chapter highlights emerging trends in official development assistance (ODA) from members of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) and other providers of development assistance. It draws on DAC statistics, the findings and recommendations of DAC peer reviews conducted since 2015 and the results of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation’s 2016 progress report. According to preliminary data, in 2016 net ODA reached yet another peak, at USD 142.6 billion, or 0.32% of gross national income, driven in part by increased spending on in-donor refugee costs. Country programmable aid and flows to least developed countries and small island developing states are declining, while the percentage of humanitarian assistance and aid channelled through the multilateral system and civil society organisations has risen. DAC members are improving the quality of their development co-operation but most still have a long way to go to meet their international commitments.

    • Australia

      Australia provided USD 3 billion in net ODA in 2016 (preliminary data), which represented 0.25% of gross national income (GNI) and a fall of 12.7% in real terms from 2015, due to cuts in the bilateral aid programme. Australia’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 100% in 2015 (up from 89.1% in 2014), while the DAC average was 78.1%.

    • Austria

      In 2016, Austria provided USD 1.58 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.41% of gross national income (GNI) and an 18.3% increase in real terms from 2015, due largely to an increase in in-donor refugee costs and multilateral contributions. Austria plans to double its budget for bilateral co-operation by 2021. Austria’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 36.4% in 2015 (down from 48.2% in 2014), while the DAC average was 78.1%.

    • Belgium

      In 2016, Belgium provided USD 2.3 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.49% of gross national income (GNI) and a rise of 19.6% in real terms from 2015, mostly because of increased in-donor refugee costs. There is a negative outlook for Belgium’s ODA. The government’s commitment to reach the target of 0.7% ODA/GNI is included in law; however, the 2015 budget announced significant cuts up until 2019. Belgium’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 96.7% in 2015 (remaining stable since 2014). The 2015 DAC average was 78.1%.

    • Canada

      In 2016, Canada provided USD 4 billion in net ODA (preliminary data). This represented 0.26% of gross national income (GNI) and a decrease of 4.4% in real terms from 2015 due to the timings of payments, although it has increased support to in-donor refugees. The 2016 budget allocated an additional CAD 256 million for 2016-17 and 2017-18. Canada’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 98.5% in 2015 (up from 93% in 2014), which is above the DAC average of 78.1%.

    • Czech Republic

      In 2016, the Czech Republic provided USD 261 million in net ODA (preliminary data). This represented 0.14% of gross national income (GNI) and an increase of 29.3% in real terms from 2015, due to the increased contributions to the EU budget for development. It plans to increase its ODA to reach an intermediary target of 0.17% of ODA/GNI by 2020. The 2016 DAC Peer Review of the Czech Republic recommended that it should prepare a more ambitious plan for reaching its commitment of 0.33% ODA/GNI by 2030 (OECD, 2016). Its share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) increased from 32.4% in 2014 to 44.3% in 2015, but is below the 2015 DAC average of 78.1%.

    • Denmark

      In 2016, Denmark provided USD 2.4 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.75% of gross national income (GNI), and a 7.6% decrease in real terms from 2015, due to cuts in its bilateral aid programme. Denmark is one of six DAC members to achieve the UN target of 0.7% ODA/GNI. From 2016, Denmark's ODA is expected to drop to approximately 0.7%, in line with government policy. Denmark's share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 100% in 2015 (up from 95.1% in 2014), compared to the DAC average of 78.1%.

    • European Union institutions

      In 2016, the EU institutions provided USD 15.7 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented a 14.3% increase in real terms from 2015, mostly due to increased bilateral projects with developing countries and increased humanitarian aid. The EU institutions’ ODA budget is determined within the EU multi-year financial framework. ODA grew steadily between 2003 and 2012, when it peaked at USD 17.5 billion. This trend was, however, reversed in 2013. The EU institutions’ share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 62.3% in 2015 (down from 65.6% in 2014).

    • Finland

      In 2016, Finland provided USD 1.1 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.44% of gross national income (GNI) and a fall of 18.7% in real terms from 2015 due to cuts in the ODA budget, which were partly offset by increases in its contributions to the EU development budget and in-donor refugee costs. At the same time, Finland, like other EU member countries, committed in 2015 to provide 0.7% of GNI as ODA by 2030. The share of Finnish ODA that is untied (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) has slightly increased, from 90.4% in 2014 to 92.6% in 2015, compared to the 2015 DAC average of 78.1%.

    • France

      In 2016, France provided USD 9.5 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.38% of gross national income (GNI) and a 4.6% increase in real terms from 2015, due to an increase in bilateral lending. France is committed, at European level, to collectively achieve a 0.7% ODA/GNI ratio by 2030. France’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 95.6% in 2015 (increasing from 92.3% in 2014, compared to the DAC average of 78.1%.

    • Germany

      In 2016, Germany provided USD 24.7 billion in net ODA (preliminary data). This represented 0.70% of gross national income (GNI) and a 36.1% increase in real terms from 2015, due to the overall scaling up of its aid programme and doubling of in-donor refugee costs. In 2016 Germany’s ODA hit a record high it and reached the 0.7% ODA/GNI target for the first time. It is just one of six DAC members to do so. Germany’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 84% in 2015 (up from 83.6% in 2014), compared to the DAC average of 78.1%.

    • Greece

      In 2016, Greece provided USD 264 million in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.14% of gross national income (GNI) and an increase of 10.8% in real terms from 2015 partly due to increased contributions to the EU development budget. Greece’s ODA budget decreased between 2009 and 2014 as a direct consequence of the severe economic crisis. Greece’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 14.5% in 2015, decreasing from 22% in 2014, thus below the 2015 DAC average of 78.1%.

    • Hungary

      In 2016, Hungary provided USD 155 million in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.13% of gross national income (GNI) and a 0.5% increase in real terms from 2015. As all member states that have joined the European Union since 2002, Hungary has committed to attain a 0.33% ODA/GNI ratio by 2030. At present, data on other official flows, private grants (funds raised by non‑governmental organisations and foundations) and private flows at market terms from Hungary to developing countries are not available.

    • Iceland

      In 2016, Iceland delivered USD 50 million in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.25% of its gross national income (GNI) and an 11.6% increase in real terms from 2015, due in part to increased support for in-donor refugee costs. Iceland has a long-standing commitment to joining the ranks of those countries which have achieved 0.7% ODA/GNI. However, following the 2008-11 financial and banking crisis, Iceland has revised its ambitious timetable for achieving this target, with the parliament adopting a revised plan for ODA levels to reach 0.26% by 2018 and to remain at this level until 2021. Iceland untied 100% of its ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) in 2015, compared to the DAC average of 78.1%. Its ODA was also fully untied in 2014 and 2013.

    • Ireland

      In 2016, Ireland provided USD 802 million in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.33% of gross national income (GNI) and an 11.9% increase in real terms from 2015 due mainly to an increase in its contributions to multilateral organisations. In its budget statement for 2016, for the first time in seven years the government increased the ODA budget. Ireland, like other EU member countries, made a new commitment to meeting the 0.7% ODA/GNI target by 2030. Its share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 100% in 2015 (up from 98.2% in 2014), compared with the DAC average of 78.1%.

    • Italy

      In 2016, Italy provided USD 4.9 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.26% of gross national income (GNI) and a 20.2% increase in real terms from 2015 due to increased in-donor refugee costs as well as a rise in its contributions to multilateral organisations. In line with Italy’s commitment to scale up its aid, ODA has increased both in terms of volume and as a percentage of GNI over the last three years. Italy’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 95.1% in 2015 (up from 93.5% in 2014), while the DAC average was 78.1%.

    • Japan

      In 2016, Japan provided USD 10.4 billion in net ODA (preliminary data). This represented 0.20% of gross national income (GNI) and a 0.9% increase in real terms from 2015 due to a slight increase in its bilateral ODA. In 2015, the untied share of Japanese total bilateral ODA, excluding technical co-operation, was 82.3%, a decrease of 7.3 percentage points from 2014. Japan’s ODA includes a large technical co-operation programme, but Japan does not report its tying status. The share of total Japanese bilateral aid reported as untied was 74.6% in 2015.

    • Korea

      In 2016, Korea provided USD 1.97 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.14% of gross national income (GNI) and a 3.4% increase in real terms from 2015 due to an increase in its bilateral aid. Korea missed its ODA/GNI target of 0.25% by 2015 but has set a new target of 0.30% ODA/GNI by 2030. To help reach this target Korea plans to publish an ODA growth plan with milestones. Korea’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 50.2% in 2015 (down from 53.2% in 2014), compared to the DAC average of 78.1%.

    • Luxembourg

      In 2016, Luxembourg provided USD 384 million in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 1% of gross national income (GNI) and an increase of 7.7% in real terms from 2015 in line with increases in its overall aid programme. Luxembourg is one of only six DAC members to have met the UN target of 0.7% in 2016. Luxembourg’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) increased from 97.5% in 2014 to 98.8% in 2015 and is above the DAC average of 78.1%.

    • Netherlands

      In 2016, the Netherlands provided USD 4.99 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.65% of gross national income (GNI) and a decrease of 13.1% in real terms from 2015, mostly due to lower expenditures for in-donor refugees compared to 2015. The Netherlands’ ODA/GNI ratio slipped below the UN target of 0.7% in 2016 – the third time since 1974. The Netherlands’ share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 92.7% in 2015 (down from 98.4% in 2014), above the DAC average of 78.1%.

    • New Zealand

      In 2016, New Zealand provided USD 438 million in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.25% of gross national income (GNI) and a decrease of 2.5% in real terms from 2015, due to annual fluctuations in its increased three-year aid budget. New Zealand has committed to a NZD 220 million increase in ODA over the 2015/16-2017/18 triennium. New Zealand’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 84.7% in 2015 (up from 81.8% in 2014), compared with the DAC average of 78.1%.

    • Norway

      In 2016, Norway provided USD 4.4 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 1.11% of gross national income (GNI) and a 7.8% increase in real terms from 2015, due mainly to increased in-donor refugee costs. Norway is one of only six DAC members to have met the UN target of 0.7% and it has consistently maintained its level of development assistance, having spent about 1% of GNI on ODA every year since 2009. All of Norway’s ODA was untied in 2015 (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) whilst the DAC average was 78.1%.

    • Poland

      In 2016, Poland provided USD 603 million in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.13% of gross national income (GNI) and a 42.6% increase in real terms from 2015, due to increased contributions to the EU development budget. Scaling up its ODA to deliver on its international commitment to achieve an ODA to GNI ratio of 0.33% by 2030 will be challenging without a plan. Poland’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 33.6% in 2015 (up from 31% in 2014), compared to the DAC average of 78.1%.

    • Portugal

      In 2016, Portugal provided USD 340 million in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.17% of gross national income (GNI) and a rise of 8.9% in real terms from 2015 due to an increase in its contributions to the EU development budget. Portugal’s ODA increased in 2016 for the first time since 2011. Portugal intends to meet its ODA target when its economy begins to recover (OECD, 2015) and is committed, at the European level, to collectively achieve a 0.7% ODA/GNI ratio by 2030. Portugal’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 49% in 2015 (up from 34.5% in 2014), compared to the DAC average of 78.1%.

    • Slovak Republic

      In 2016, the Slovak Republic provided USD 107 million in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.12% of gross national income (GNI) and a rise of 26.8% in real terms from 2015 due to increased contributions to the EU development budget. The Slovak Republic is committed to gradually meeting the official development assistance (ODA) target of 0.33% adopted at the EU level, as its economy recovers. The Slovak Republic’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 47.5% in 2015 (up from 1.2% in 2014), compared to the DAC average of 78.1%.

    • Slovenia

      In 2016, Slovenia provided USD 80 million in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.18% of gross national income (GNI) and a rise of 25.3% in real terms from 2015 due to increased contributions to international organisations. It shall strive to increase its ODA/GNI to 0.33% by 2030 as agreed at the EU level. Slovenia’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 12.4% in 2015, while the DAC average was 78.1%.

    • Spain

      In 2016, Spain provided USD 4.1 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.33% of gross national income (GNI) and a 192.3% increase in real terms from 2015, due to exceptional debt relief for Cuba. Spain is committed, at EU level, to collectively achieve a 0.7% ODA/GNI ratio by 2030. Spain’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) decreased from 83.6% in 2014 to 80.8% in 2015, compared with the DAC average of 78.1% in 2015.

    • Sweden

      In 2016, Sweden provided USD 4.9 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.94% of gross national income (GNI) and a 31.1% decrease in real terms from 2015, mostly due to lower costs for in-donor refugees compared to 2015, as well as lower contributions to multilateral organisations due to advance payments paid in 2015. Sweden is one of only six DAC members to have met the UN target of 0.7% and the government is committed by law to continue delivering 1% of its GNI to ODA, which is backed by a broad bipartisan support in parliament. Sweden’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) slightly increased from 85.8% in 2014 to 86.8% in 2015, and remains above the DAC average of 78.1% in 2015.

    • Switzerland

      In 2016, Switzerland provided USD 3.6 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.54% of gross national income (GNI) and a 4.2% increase in real terms from 2015, due to increased in-donor refugee costs, even though the aid budget was cut. The tightening of the Swiss federal budget has decreased the target of ODA to GNI from 0.5% to 0.48%, as approved by parliament. The government announced it might cut the budget further, further decreasing the aid to national income ratio by 2020. Switzerland’s share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 94.6% in 2015 (up from 93.9% in 2014), above the DAC average of 78.1%.

    • United Kingdom

      In 2016, the United Kingdom provided USD 18 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.7% of gross national income (GNI) and an 8.4% increase in real terms from 2015, mainly due to the scaling up of its aid. The United Kingdom is one of only six DAC members to have met the UN target of 0.7% of ODA/GNI in 2016. It is committed to keeping this ratio stable. All of the United Kingdom’s ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was untied in 2015, while the DAC average was 78.1%.

    • United States

      In 2016, the United States provided USD 33.6 billion in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.18% of gross national income (GNI) and a 7% increase in real terms from 2015. The United States’ share of untied ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 55.5% in 2015 (down from 62.5% in 2014), while the DAC average was 78.1%.

    • Profiles of other development co-operation providers

      This chapter presents information on the volume and key features of the development co-operation provided by countries that are not members of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC). Estimated development co-operation flows by 30 providers beyond the DAC reached USD 24.6 billion in 2015, compared to USD 32.0 billion in 2014. The chapter includes the 20 providers who reported to the OECD on their development co-operation programmes, as well as 10 other providers that are priority partners for the DAC. For the priority partners, the OECD estimates the volume of their programme based on official government reports, complemented by web-based research (mainly on contributions to multilateral organisations). The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the only private funding entity that reported to the OECD, is also included in this chapter.

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