West African Papers

ISSN: 
2414-2026 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/24142026
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The West African Papers series explores African socio-economic, political and security dynamics from a regional and multidisciplinary perspective. It seeks to stimulate discussion and gather information to better anticipate the changes that will shape future policies. The series is designed for a wide audience of specialists, development practitioners, decision makers and the informed public. Papers are available in English and/or French, and summaries are available in both languages. Initiated by the Sahel and West Africa Club (SWAC) to highlight and promote West African issues, the work presented is prepared by its Secretariat, Members and partners, other OECD departments, related international organisations, associated experts and researchers.
Also available in French
 

Climate Impacts in the Sahel and West Africa

The Role of Climate Science in Policy Making You or your institution have access to this content

English
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/5jlsmktwjcd0-en.pdf
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Author(s):
Kirsty Lewis1, Carlo Buontempo1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: Met Office UK, Hadley Centre, United Kingdom

25 Aug 2016
Bibliographic information
No.:
2
Pages:
20
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5jlsmktwjcd0-en

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Given that the population of the Sahel depends largely on rain-fed agriculture and transhumant livestock rearing, there is a growing concern about the future climate of the region as global warming may alter the availability of water resources. The lack of consensus on climate projections for West Africa results partly from the inability of climate models to capture some basic features of present-day climate variability in the region. As a result, climate model projections are difficult to analyse in terms of impacts and provide little guidance to inform decision making on adaption and resilience-building. However, by engaging with users of climate information to better understand their activities and their sensitivities to weather and climate, and by looking beyond the user to understand the wider systems context in which climate change occurs, progress can be made in interpreting climate impacts. This paper reviews the latest climate projections for West Africa and considers alternative ways in which the knowledge generated from climate science can be understood in the context of preparing for an uncertain future that provides practical help for decision makers.
Keywords:
climate science, West Africa, climate projections, climate variability, climate change
JEL Classification:
  • Q54: Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics ; Environmental and Ecological Economics / Environmental Economics / Climate ; Natural Disasters and Their Management ; Global Warming
  • Q58: Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics ; Environmental and Ecological Economics / Environmental Economics / Government Policy
 
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