African Security Governance
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African Security Governance

Emerging Issues

Africa faces a seemingly ever-increasing range of security challenges. This book is a result of research carried out over a number of years by the Southern African Defense and Security Management Network (SADSEM) on many of these new and emerging security issues, in cooperation with the Danish Institute for International Studies and the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung. The broad focus is on security governance – the role of state and a wide range of social actors in the areas of both human and state security. It deals with a range of sectors, themes and national case studies and makes an important contribution to debates on security sector reform. The topics covered include policing transformation, intelligence governance, regulation of private security actors, challenges of nuclear proliferation, regional security, peace diplomacy and peace missions, the relationship between development and security and new challenges in governance of the military.
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Chapter
 

Governance of the military in Zambia You do not have access to this content

English
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Author(s):
Godfrey Haantobolo

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Why is it that the study of the Zambian case in the civil control of the military is an important component in the overall understanding of civil—military relations in Africa? In answering this question, Decalo argues that while there is ‘voluminous literature on the sources of civil—military strife in Africa, there is an incredible lack of academic attention to the reverse condition, civil—military stability’ (1991: 67–68). He further points out that: