OECD Journal on Development

Discontinued
Frequency :
Quarterly
ISSN :
1996-580X (online)
ISSN :
1816-8124 (print)
DOI :
10.1787/1996580x
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The journal of the OECD Development Assistance Committee that includes reports on the DAC’s reviews of member country’s development co-operation policies, as well as analytical reports on various development issues.  The first issue of the year always presents the DAC Chairman’s annual Development Co-operation Report.

Also available in: French
 

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Mark Number Date Article Volume and Issue Click to Access
  23 Sep 2010 DAC Peer Review of Switzerland
OECD
Switzerland’s aid volume was USD 2.02 billion in 2008, an increase of more than 6% over the previous year, and a total of 0.42% of its gross national income (GNI). In 2008 it had already surpassed its Monterrey commitment to contribute 0.4% of its GNI to official development assistance (ODA) by 2010. Switzerland should adopt a 0.5% target for its aid, keeping in mind the 0.7% UN target. Switzerland has a long tradition of international assistance; its aid to humanitarian causes and multilateral donors serves as an example in good practice. Although Switzerland contributes to international thinking on governance and development in fragile situations, it faces challenges in implementing some of the international principles for making aid more effective, particularly in fragile states. Swiss aid is dispersed among too many countries and sectors, and it now strives to strengthen its focus. While welcoming the steps Switzerland has taken to reinforce its strategic approach to development co-operation, greater cohesion between the Ministries of Economic and Foreign Affairs would reduce duplication and transaction costs. In reforming its aid system, Switzerland will need to do more to set standards, monitor outcomes and assess impact of its development co operation programmes. Switzerland has made progress in bringing areas such as trade and the restitution of stolen assets in line with its commitments to development. It must build on such examples to ensure that all policies are coherent with its development aims. Switzerland must also strengthen efforts to communicate the positive results of aid in order to maintain strong public and political support.
Volume 10 Issue 4 Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/4309041ec003.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/development/dac-peer-review-of-switzerland_journal_dev-10-5km7jvnl3rxs
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  23 Sep 2010 DAC Peer Review of Italy
OECD
The Italian development co-operation is facing major challenges. The first is an urgent need to reform official development co-operation in the absence of political consensus on how to proceed. The second is that Italy will fail to meet its international commitment to increase official development assistance (ODA) to 0.51% of its gross national income (GNI) by 2010 and is unlikely to meet 0.7% by 2015. In 2008 Italy’s ODA/GNI ratio was 0.22. Despite the challenges remaining, there has been some improvement in Italian aid management since 2008. Italy intends to focus on 35 priority countries, the greater authority given to Italy’s embassies and technical offices to deliver and to contribute to formulating programmes and deliver aid, and the Steering Committee on Development Co-operation’s high level policy direction. Italy still needs a strategy for its development co-operation that is shared by all relevant government departments and regional and local authorities working towards common objectives: building systems to promote coherence between development co-operation and other policies; reforming human resource management for the core cadre of development experts; and regularly undertaking monitoring and independent evaluation. In addition, the limited political debate and public awareness about Italian development co-operation show there is an urgent need for the Italian authorities, together with civil society, to build popular support for development and public pressure for reforming Italian development co-operation.
Volume 10 Issue 4 Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/4309041ec002.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/development/dac-peer-review-of-italy_journal_dev-10-5km7jvnl5sf7
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  23 Sep 2010 2009 OECD Report on Division of Labour
OECD
Developing countries differ greatly in their potential for development and in the challenges they face. In one respect, however, many share a common problem: too little aid from too many donors. This report traces up to 3 700 aid relationships between all 151 aid recipient countries and the 46 largest donors, covering all members of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) and the largest multilateral agencies. This complex reality is often referred to as fragmentation of aid. This 2009 report examines the concept of aid fragmentation across countries, and what has happened since the adoption of the Paris Declaration. It also proposes measures for concentration and fragmentation, and options for tackling excessive fragmentation. Where a donor-partner aid relation is not considered non-significant from either the donor’s or the recipient’s point of view, there is an opportunity for some rationalisation. This report shows that a decrease of 23% in the number of relationships is possible when only 4% of aid is reorganised. This reorganisation, in turn, would lead to an increase in the volume of the average donor-partner aid relation of 30%.
Volume 10 Issue 4 Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/4309041ec001.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/development/2009-oecd-report-on-division-of-labour_journal_dev-10-5km7jvnlgdwb
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  04 Aug 2010 DAC Peer Review of Sweden
OECD
This review contains the Main Findings and Recommendations of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) and the report of the Secretariat. It was prepared with examiners from Japan and the United States for the Peer Review meeting on 9 June 2009. The review noted that Sweden was the most generous of all DAC donor countries as a proportion of its national income in 2008. Sweden is a leader in the areas of aid effectiveness and good humanitarian donorship. It has initiated important reforms to bolster the quality of its aid and to make its development efforts more supportive of partner country priorities. Sweden sets an example as a reliable and engaged donor to multilateral organisations but could make its support more strategic. Sweden is ahead of many donors when it comes to making its national policies and actions consistent with its development objectives, but implementation difficulties led to a revised approach, which is promising.
Volume 10 Issue 3 Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/4309031ec003.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/development/dac-peer-review-of-sweden_journal_dev-10-5km9c89v0q6g
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  04 Aug 2010 DAC Peer Review of Austria
OECD
This review contains the Main Findings and Recommendations of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) and the report of the Secretariat. It was prepared with examiners from Luxembourg and Norway for the Peer Review meeting on 29 April 2009. Among the issues covered were: the welcome efforts to focus Austrian development co-operation on the world’s poorest people; plans to substantially increase aid for humanitarian action, priority partner countries, and UN agencies; and progress made with the organisational reform started in 2004. Austria needs to sharply increase its aid to meet its commitment to reach 0.7% of ODA/GNI by 2015; to make its aid more predictable; and to increase the share of aid that can be programmed by partner countries. Staffing and technical expertise in the Foreign Affairs Ministry must be strengthened so that it can effectively carry out its mandate as the national co-ordinator for aid and development policy; there should be increased focus on public and political awareness about global development challenges; and a medium-term development policy, endorsed by the government, which commits all ministries to Austria’s development co-operation objectives.
Volume 10 Issue 3 Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/4309031ec002.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/development/dac-peer-review-of-austria_journal_dev-10-5km9c89xd7r2
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  04 Aug 2010 DAC Peer Review of Ireland
OECD
This review contains the Main Findings and Recommendations of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) and the report of the Secretariat. It was prepared with examiners from Italy and New Zealand for the Peer Review meeting on 24 March 2009. The review noted that Ireland is a champion in making aid more effective. Poverty reduction is the overarching goal of Irish Aid, and reflecting this, its programme is well concentrated on a limited number of very poor African countries. Ireland is a predictable and flexible donor, and its attention to local priorities is appreciated by the developing country partners with whom it works. It is balancing efforts to meet the best international development standards while dealing with the impact of the global economic crisis. Ireland is focusing on achieving results and should enhance its efforts to measure the impact of its aid programme. The DAC urges Ireland to communicate development results to the public to maintain support for overseas development.
Volume 10 Issue 3 Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/4309031ec001.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/development/dac-peer-review-of-ireland_journal_dev-10-5km9c8g9kb0n
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  07 Jan 2010 DAC Peer Review of Australia
OECD
This review contains the Main Findings and Recommendations of the Development Assistance Committee and the report of the Secretariat. It was prepared with examiners from Ireland and Portugal for the Peer Review on 4 December 2008. Australia has made substantial, positive changes to its aid programme since 2004, reinforcing its focus on reducing poverty, on promoting the MDGs, and completely untying its aid programme. While increasing its aid, Australia should stay focused and pursue effective approaches, including working with and through other donors. Australia successfully integrated gender equality into its aid programme and could now use the same approach to integrate environmental concerns.
Volume 10 Issue 2 Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/4309021ec004.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/development/dac-peer-review-of-australia_journal_dev-v10-art18-en
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