International Migration Outlook

Frequency :
Annual
ISSN :
1999-124X (online)
ISSN :
1995-3968 (print)
DOI :
10.1787/1999124x
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OECD’s annual publication analysing recent developments in migration movements and policies in its countries. Each edition provides the latest statistical information on immigrant stocks and flows, immigrants in the labour market, and migration policies. Country Reports provide detailed policy information for each OECD country and special reports look at current issues in immigration.

Also available in: French
 
International Migration Outlook 2007

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Author(s):
OECD
Publication Date :
09 Sep 2007
Pages :
399
ISBN :
9789264032866 (PDF) ; 9789264032859 (print)
DOI :
10.1787/migr_outlook-2007-en

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This second edition of the International Migration Outlook, a revised and expanded version of what was previously published under the title Trends in International Migration, brings the reader detailed analysis of recent trends in migration movements and policies in OECD countries. It includes harmonised statistics on long-term international migration inflows for most OECD countries. It describes measures taken to facilitate the integration of immigrants from their arrival up until they gain full citizenship. International co-operation to improve border control and to combat irregular immigration is analysed in detail. In addition, the report evaluates the impact of the enlargement of the European Union on the flow of immigrant workers into OECD countries. It highlights the growing attention given to the links between migration and development, notably in the context of regional economic integration. This edition  includes two special chapters on topical issues. The first addresses the challenge of matching immigrants’ education with employment, with the aim of adding value to human capital. The second, for the first time, analyses the importance of the presence of immigrants in the health sector of OECD countries. It also describes the migration policies put in place in OECD countries to recruit this highly qualified labour force. This edition also focuses on the employment situation and the participation rate of immigrants, particularly in the services sector.  

"The best source of analysis on the economic impact of migration."

-Hamish McRae, The Independent

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    Editorial and Introduction
    Increasing immigration of highly skilled workers into OECD countries over the past 10- 15 years, often from developing countries, has refuelled fears of a "brain drain" from developing countries of much of their skilled labour, to the profit of OECD countries. This concern has been loudest in recent years concerning the recruitment of foreign doctors and nurses by OECD countries, and with ageing populations in OECD countries driving up the demand for health professionals, there are real fears that the health care sector in many developing countries could be severely damaged by the medical "brain drain".
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    Recent Trends in International Migration
    The increases in international migration to OECD countries observed in recent years are part of a trend that is interesting to view in a broader, historical context, dating from the post-war era to the present. There have been a number of developments during this period that have influenced international migration movements, among them post-war reconstruction, the end of the colonial era, the oil crisis in 1973, the rise and fall of the Iron Curtain, the ageing of the baby-boom generation, not to mention general demographic and economic imbalances between more and less developed countries. What has been the underlying trend in international migration over this period and how have specific events affected the scale and nature of movements within the OECD world?
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    Matching Educational Background and Employment: A Challenge for Immigrants In Host Countries
    The growing migration of skilled workers is one of the salient features of recent
    international migratory trends in OECD countries, many of which have adopted measures to facilitate their recruitment, including tax incentives (OECD, 2004a). This trend is likely to persist, in light of the current and anticipated demographic changes at work in OECD countries. Even so, the processes of bringing skilled immigrants into the labour market are not always well understood and in some cases may entail particular difficulties.
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    Immigrant Health Workers in OECD Countries in the Broader Context of Highly Skilled Migration
    In recent years, concerns about growing shortages of health professionals, in particular doctors and nurses, have emerged in OECD countries. These shortages are projected to increase over the next 20 years, unless countermeasures are taken, because population ageing and changing technologies are likely to contribute to an increase in the demand for health workers, while workforce ageing will decrease the supply as the "babyboom" generation of health workers reaches retirement age. One route to partially meeting such shortages is via international migration of health workers, a route which is already being utilised in OECD countries.
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    Recent Changes in Migration Movements and Policies (Country Notes)
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    Statistical Annex
    Most of the data published in this annex are taken from the individual contributions of national correspondents appointed by the OECD Secretariat with the approval of the authorities of member countries. Consequently, these data have not necessarily been harmonised at international level. This network of correspondents, constituting the Continuous Reporting System on Migration (SOPEMI), covers most OECD member countries as well as the Baltic States, Bulgaria and Romania. SOPEMI has no authority to impose changes in data collection procedures. It has an observatory role which, by its very nature, has to use existing statistics. However, it does play an active role in suggesting what it considers to be essential improvements in data collection and makes every effort to present consistent and well-documented statistics.
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