Gender Management System

English
ISSN: 
2310-1881 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.14217/23101881
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This series of manuals will assist governments and other stakeholders, including civil society and the private sector, in mainstreaming gender using the Commonwealth Secretariat’s Gender Management System (GMS), which has been developed as a holistic and system-wide approach to promoting equality between women and men at all levels.
 
Gender Mainstreaming in Finance

Gender Mainstreaming in Finance

A Reference Manual for Governments and Other Stakeholders You do not have access to this content

English
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/0899341e.pdf
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Author(s):
Gita Sen
01 June 1999
Pages:
36
ISBN:
9781848596887 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.14217/9781848596887-en

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This is one of the sectoral guides that are part of the Gender Management System (GMS) resource kit, a series of publications presenting GMS. GMS is an innovative system developed by the Commonwealth Secretariat for gender mainstreaming. The system is a comprehensive network of structures, mechanisms and processes for bringing a gender perspective to bear on all government policies, plans, programmes and projects. The kit consists of a handbook which presents the GMS in detail; sectoral guides to gender mainstreaming in specific sectors; and resource documents to assist the user in gender analysis, monitoring, evaluation and other aspects of gender mainstreaming. Each sectoral guide also has a corresponding Quick Guide a short, userfriendly publication presenting the essential points. It is designed for policymakers, planners, field staff and other government personnel involved in gender mainstreaming, as well as for academic users, NGOs, the private sector and others who have a stake in advancing gender equality and equity.

This guide addresses both the concepts and practical steps for mainstreaming gender in the Ministries of Finance of Commonwealth governments. It includes a detailed discussion of changes in the role and influence of Ministries of Finance over the last two decades, and of how gender can be located within the work of those Ministries. It examines institutional and attitudinal barriers to mainstreaming gender within Ministries of Finance, and offers recommendations for action.
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  • Preface

    In 1996, Commonwealth Ministers Responsible for Women's Affairs mandated the Commonwealth Secretariat to develop the concept of the Gender Management System (GMS), a comprehensive network of structures, mechanisms and processes for bringing a gender perspective to bear in the mainstream of all government policies, programmes and projects. The success of the GMS depends upon a broad-based partnership in society in which government consults and acts co-operatively with the other key stakeholders, who include civil society and the private sector. The establishment and strengthening of gender management systems and of national women's machineries was the first of 15 government action points identified in the 1995 Commonwealth Plan of Action on Gender and Development.

  • Executive Summary

    This manual addresses the conceptual basis and practical steps for mainstreaming gender in Commonwealth government Ministries of Finance. It includes detailed discussion of the changes that have occurred in the role and influence of Ministries of Finance over the last two decades, and of how gender can be located within the work of Ministries of Finance. It examines some of the institutional and attitudinal barriers to mainstreaming gender within Ministries of Finance, and offers recommendations for action.

  • Introduction

    Although the historical antecedents of modern-day women's movements go back at least to the previous century, particular attention has been paid during the last three decades to the concerns of women in the development process. Starting with the pioneering effort of Ester Boserup (1970), considerable effort has been expended by researchers, activists and policy-makers in analysing gender relations in the context of development, in understanding their practical consequences for women and men, and drawing out the policy implications thereof.

  • The Changing Role of Ministries of Finance

    It can be argued that during much of this century and prior to the 1980s, the role of Ministries of Finance, while significant, was by no means pre-eminent in the development policy process. The Finance Ministry was expected to manage the government's resources through the annual budget (taxes, expenditures and transfers) so as to ensure that economic decisions taken in the Planning Ministry or other ministries such as industry, agriculture, rural development, health, education, etc. were financially viable. While the Finance Ministry might have urged fiscal caution in the face of over-ambitious economic plans, it rarely acted as a barrier.

  • Mainstreaming Gender in the Work of Ministries of Finance

    The last few years have witnessed a spate of economic research and writing pointing to the importance of engendering the macroeconomic reforms that are currently under way in many Commonwealth countries (Cagatay, Elson and Grown, 1995; Bakker, 1994; Sen, 1996). This literature goes beyond the feminist writing of the previous decade which largely emphasised the impact of structural adjustment reform packages on women. While exploring this impact in greater depth, current writing focuses much more on their feedback effects for the viability of the reform process itself.

  • Institutional and Attitudinal Concerns

    Ministries of Finance, even today, hold that ensuring fiscal and monetary discipline is their overriding objective, and that liberalisation and privatisation are important mechanisms to achieve this objective. This apparently exclusive focus on short-run macro stabilisation of economic aggregates through budgetary management seems to insulate the Finance Ministry from a need to weigh the implications of its actions for human resources development over the medium and longer terms.

  • Recommendations for Action

    In order to engender Ministries of Finance, a number of strategic areas of action have been identified, with specific action points in each area. These are summarised in Figure 4 and discussed in greater detail in the sections that follow. These action points are not sequential in time; some of them may be undertaken simultaneously.

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