Microcomputers in Schools

Microcomputers in Schools

Policy and Implementation Guidelines You do not have access to this content

English
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/0891081e.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/commonwealth/education/microcomputers-in-schools_9781848594746-en
  • READ
Author(s):
Commonwealth Secretariat
01 Jan 1991
Pages:
26
ISBN:
9781848594746 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.14217/9781848594746-en
loader image

Expand / Collapse Hide / Show all Abstracts Table of Contents

  • Mark Click to Access
  • Preface

    Many countries have begun to use microcomputers in the classroom; others are considering their use. The purpose of this book is to help those making decisions about their use and about the role of information technology in the classroom. Ministers of Education, at their conference in Cyprus in 1984, asked the Commonwealth Secretariat to look into these issues in order to produce unbiassed advice, based on Commonwealth-wide experience, to help member countries.

  • Introduction

    This book is about information technology in the classroom. Its purpose is to provide information to anyone who might be involved in the planning and implementation of a national programme for the introduction of computers into schools.

  • Policy

    The phrase 'Information Technology' is used to encompass a range of 'new' technologies and their applications, including all aspects of the use of computers, microelectronic devices, satellite and communications technology. These emerging technologies seem revolutionary because of the speed of their development but they can also be seen as the most recent developments in our evolving ability to record, access, manipulate and communicate information.

  • Implementation

    Information technology in schools is still a relatively new area of curriculum development. As more educators become involved, and as the technology itself develops, new opportunities for education will become apparent. It is important, therefore, that structures which are created to implement a national project are flexible enough to respond and react to new developments, as they occur.

  • Add to Marked List