OECD Food, Agriculture and Fisheries Papers

ISSN :
1815-6797 (online)
DOI :
10.1787/18156797
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Selected studies on various food, agriculture and fisheries issues from the OECD Trade and Agriculture Directorate.

NB. No. 1 to No. 58 were released under the previous series title OECD Food, Agriculture and Fisheries Working Papers.

 

The Economic Value of Rebuilding Fisheries You or your institution have access to this content

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Author(s):
Christopher Costello1, Brian P. Kinlan2, Sarah E. Lester1, Steven D. Gaines1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: University of California, United States

  • 2: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, United States

Publication Date
16 Apr 2012
Bibliographic information
No.:
55
Pages
69
DOI
10.1787/5k9bfqnmptd2-en

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The global demand for protein from seafood – whether wild, caught or cultured, whether for direct consumption or as feed for livestock – is high and projected to continue growing. However, the ocean’s ability to meet this demand is uncertain due to either mismanagement or, in some cases, lack of management of marine fish stocks. Efforts to rebuild and recover the world’s fisheries will benefit from an improved understanding of the long-term economic benefits of recovering collapsed stocks, the trajectory and duration of different rebuilding approaches, variation in the value and timing of recovery for fisheries with different economic, biological, and regulatory characteristics, including identifying which fisheries are likely to benefit most from recovery, and the benefits of avoiding collapse in the first place. These questions are addressed using a dynamic bioeconomic optimisation model that explicitly accounts for economics, management, and ecology of size-structured exploited fish populations. Within this model framework, different management options (effort controls on small-, medium-, and large-sized fish) including management that optimises economic returns over a specified planning horizon are simulated and the consequences compared. The results show considerable economic gains from rebuilding fisheries, with magnitudes varying across fisheries.