Review of Fisheries in OECD Countries 2009
Hide / Show Abstract

Review of Fisheries in OECD Countries 2009

Policies and Summary Statistics

This publication describes major developments affecting fisheries in OECD countries in 2005, 2006 and some recent events of 2007, including changes in national and international policies, trade, and fisheries and aquaculture production. This edition contains a special chapter on Climate Change, Adaptation and the Fisheries Sector: A Review of the Key Issues. 

COUNTRIES COVERED: Argentina, Chinese Taipei, Thailand (observers); Australia, Belgium Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France Germany, Greece, Icelend, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.

Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/5310011e.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/agriculture-and-food/review-of-fisheries-in-oecd-countries-2009_rev_fish_pol-2009-en
  • READ
 
Chapter
 

Climate Change, Adaptation and the Fisheries Sector You do not have access to this content

English
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/5310011ec003.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/agriculture-and-food/review-of-fisheries-in-oecd-countries-2009/climate-change-adaptation-and-the-fisheries-sector_rev_fish_pol-2009-3-en
  • READ
Author(s):
OECD

Hide / Show Abstract

This chapter highlights a number of key issues. First, it outlines with what might be expected, drawing on the Fourth Assessment Report of the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA), and past experience. Secondly, the chapter considers implications of changes in fish stock productivity and, finally, considers the consequences of changed stock migration or habitat location and what this means for stocks shared between two or more countries and those partly or wholly found on the high seas.
 
Visit the OECD web site