Fisheries
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Fisheries

While Stocks Last?

The fish on your plate may have been caught by a high-tech trawler, trapped by a lone fisher, farmed along with tons of others, or even stolen by pirates. It may have been captured in the South Atlantic, landed in Europe, and processed in China. Globalisation, North-South relations, changing attitudes and lifestyles, and the way we manage natural resources all influence fisheries.

This book uses the expertise of the OECD to assess these issues, and describes the challenges facing those who work in the industry. Apart from the fishers themselves and their families, it also draws on the points of view of NGOs, government specialists, scientists and independent experts.

This book includes StatLinks, URLs under graphs and tables linking to Excel® spreadsheets showing the underlying data

"We at International Aquafeed would recommend this to anyone involved in marine fishing and even to those in aquaculture to and aqua policy development as a foundation document for future decision-making. Well done Patrick Love."
                                                                                   -The Aquaculturists Blog

Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/0110081e.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/agriculture-and-food/fisheries_9789264079915-en
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Publication Date :
28 July 2010
DOI :
10.1787/9789264079915-en
 
Chapter
 

Pirate Fishing You or your institution have access to this content

Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/0110081ec005.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/agriculture-and-food/fisheries/pirate-fishing_9789264079915-5-en
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Author(s):
OECD
Pages :
62–73
DOI :
10.1787/9789264079915-5-en

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Fishing is big business and profits can be huge, so competition for access to stocks is fierce. Pirate fishers ignore the rules designed to protect resources and ensure equitable shares. They destroy the livelihood of other fishers and threaten the existence of fish species. Combating pirate fishing is hard because the penalties for those caught are low compared with potential gains, and even catching them is difficult given the vast areas of ocean to be covered, the limited means of anti-piracy authorities, and the complicity of some states and customers.
Also available in: French