Fisheries
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Fisheries

While Stocks Last?

The fish on your plate may have been caught by a high-tech trawler, trapped by a lone fisher, farmed along with tons of others, or even stolen by pirates. It may have been captured in the South Atlantic, landed in Europe, and processed in China. Globalisation, North-South relations, changing attitudes and lifestyles, and the way we manage natural resources all influence fisheries.

This book uses the expertise of the OECD to assess these issues, and describes the challenges facing those who work in the industry. Apart from the fishers themselves and their families, it also draws on the points of view of NGOs, government specialists, scientists and independent experts.

This book includes StatLinks, URLs under graphs and tables linking to Excel® spreadsheets showing the underlying data

"We at International Aquafeed would recommend this to anyone involved in marine fishing and even to those in aquaculture to and aqua policy development as a foundation document for future decision-making. Well done Patrick Love."
                                                                                   -The Aquaculturists Blog

Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/0110081e.pdf
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Publication Date :
28 July 2010
DOI :
10.1787/9789264079915-en
 
Chapter
 

Fisheries: Common Wealth? You or your institution have access to this content

Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/0110081ec009.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/agriculture-and-food/fisheries/fisheries_9789264079915-9-en
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Author(s):
OECD
Pages :
126–139
DOI :
10.1787/9789264079915-9-en

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The oceans are the last great global commons. The UN Law of the Sea governs some aspects such as the 200-mile zones around coasts and the right to exploit the continental shelf, but in theory, anyone can travel the rest of the world’s seas and exploit their resources relatively unhindered. Governing a shared, global resource like fish poses special problems. Conservation efforts by one group can be worthless if the only result is to allow another a bigger share of the catch. Yet if fisheries are to be sustainable, the political and other barriers to effective co-operation have to be overcome.
Also available in: French